Christian Tetzlaff
Violin

“Tetzlaff, playing as if his life depended on it, transported his audience from the Hungarian gypsy camp to the salons of Vienna. It was the trip of lifetime.” (Independent on Sunday)

Contacts

Lydia Connolly +44 (0)20 3725 9118
Janet Marsden +44 (0)20 3725 9140
Márcio Bugalho Domingues +44 (0)20 3725 9186

Biography

Equally at home in Classical, Romantic and contemporary repertoire, Christian Tetzlaff sets standards with his interpretations of the Violin Concertos of Beethoven, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Berg and Ligeti, and is renowned for his innovative chamber music projects and performances of Bach.

The 2016/17 season sees Christian perform with the Metropolitan Orchestra New York, the Los Angeles and London Philharmonic Orchestras, the Chicago and Sydney Symphony Orchestras and he will be artist in residence at the Netherlands Philharmonic in Amsterdam. He will join the Scottish Chamber Orchestra and Robin Ticciati on a tour of East Asia and to the United States with pianist Lars Vogt. In addition he will tour Europe with the Tetzlaff Quartett and in trio with Tanja Tetzlaff and Lars Vogt to cities such as Paris, London, Amsterdam and Berlin.

Equally at home in Classical, Romantic and contemporary repertoire, Christian Tetzlaff sets standards with his interpretations of the Violin Concertos of Beethoven, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Berg and Ligeti, and is renowned for his innovative chamber music projects and performances of Bach.

The 2016/17 season sees Christian perform with the Metropolitan Orchestra New York, the Los Angeles and London Philharmonic Orchestras, the Chicago and Sydney Symphony Orchestras and he will be artist in residence at the Netherlands Philharmonic in Amsterdam. He will join the Scottish Chamber Orchestra and Robin Ticciati on a tour of East Asia and to the United States with pianist Lars Vogt. In addition he will tour Europe with the Tetzlaff Quartett and in trio with Tanja Tetzlaff and Lars Vogt to cities such as Paris, London, Amsterdam and Berlin.

Recent highlights include performances with the Wiener Philharmoniker, Royal Concertgebouw, London and Boston Symphony orchestras, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Staatskapelle Dresden and the Budapest Festival Orchestra as well as being Artist-in Residence with the Berliner Philharmoniker.

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Contacts

Lydia Connolly +44 (0)20 3725 9118
Janet Marsden +44 (0)20 3725 9140
Márcio Bugalho Domingues +44 (0)20 3725 9186

Reviews

“He seemed so completely immersed in the concerto that the overall impression was not so much of his playing it as living it. Any performance has to transcend concepts of virtuosity if it is to have its full impact. Technically, Tetzlaff is flawless, and the sound he makes with his modern Greiner violin – he doesn’t play a Strad – is effortlessly beautiful. But it’s the way the shape and meaning of every phrase is joyously integrated into a seamless whole that is so utterly beguiling. This is true even in the vast cadenzas, which Tetzlaff based on those Beethoven added to a later piano transcription of the work, having left his original violinist to improvise his own. …Unforgettable: the greatest performance of the work I’ve ever heard.” (Tim Ashley, The Guardian, May 2015)

“Purity and security, perspective and spaciousness. … The violinist Christian Tetzlaff made the hoarse, occluded acoustic of the Queen Elizabeth Hall sing. His recital of unaccompanied sonatas and partitas by Bach and Bartók moved between introspection and savage expressivity in athletic dances, votive arias, enigmatic fugues and dusty laments from two centuries.”  5 stars (Anna Picard, The Times, April 2015)

“He seemed so completely immersed in the concerto that the overall impression was not so much of his playing it as living it. Any performance has to transcend concepts of virtuosity if it is to have its full impact. Technically, Tetzlaff is flawless, and the sound he makes with his modern Greiner violin – he doesn’t play a Strad – is effortlessly beautiful. But it’s the way the shape and meaning of every phrase is joyously integrated into a seamless whole that is so utterly beguiling. This is true even in the vast cadenzas, which Tetzlaff based on those Beethoven added to a later piano transcription of the work, having left his original violinist to improvise his own. …Unforgettable: the greatest performance of the work I’ve ever heard.” (Tim Ashley, The Guardian, May 2015)

“Purity and security, perspective and spaciousness. … The violinist Christian Tetzlaff made the hoarse, occluded acoustic of the Queen Elizabeth Hall sing. His recital of unaccompanied sonatas and partitas by Bach and Bartók moved between introspection and savage expressivity in athletic dances, votive arias, enigmatic fugues and dusty laments from two centuries.”  5 stars (Anna Picard, The Times, April 2015)

“Christian Tetzlaff, more than any other violinist around today, is utterly attuned to Schumann’s idiom in these later works.” (Harriet Smith, Gramophone, January 2014)

“In Christian Tetzlaff [Shostakovich’s Violin Concerto No.1] had an authoritative interpreter of the highest class. Whether it was in the long soliloquy lines of the opening movement or the almost hysteria-driven violence of the scherzo, or the hugely demanding solo cadenza between the last two movements, Tetzlaff was equal to all its demands. There are few violinists to match him at the moment.” (Martin Kettle, The Guardian, May 2013)

“The German violinist articulated Brahms’ Violin Sonatas as intimate, lyrical conversations. … Tetzlaff’s violin speaking intimately as though one-to-one with each member of the audience, until the hall seems to shrink to the size of a drawing-room hosting a musical soirée.” (Financial Times, January 2013)

“Christian Tetzlaff … body swaying with the music’s passions, fingers dancing near the violin’s bridge, spinning a thread of silvery sound ethereal yet passionate, the dynamics graded with infinite grace...We sat rapt as its melodic line and decorative frills leaped and shimmered up and down the violin’s register. What a superb player Tetzlaff is.” (The Arts Desk, April 2012)

“Christian Tetzlaff was the perfect advocate, performing the solo part's virtuosic heroics with phenomenal energy and persuasive conviction, and really bringing the work's inherent lyricism to the fore.” (The Strad, November 2011)

“You couldn’t wish for a better exponent today than the German violinist Christian Tetzlaff, with his Protean ability to take on the character of whatever work he is playing. The character here was Slavonic, and from his opening flourish he found a genial sweetness of tone. Even when playing pianissimo and stratospherically high, he still dominated the orchestra.” (The Independent, September 2011)

“Christian Tetzlaff had already had us on the edge of our seats for a Brahms Violin Concerto that will be my benchmark interpretation from now on. The soloist's scorching opening statement, the airy sweetness of his calming serenades, and the heel-stomping dances of the final movement were all breathtaking. Tetzlaff, playing as if his life depended on it, transported his audience from the Hungarian gypsy camp to the salons of Vienna. It was the trip of lifetime.” (Independent on Sunday, August 2011)

“This has to be the most extraordinarily intense and dramatic rendition of this great piece I have heard... Tetzlaff’s first statement burst in with startling urgency, like a truth that had to be uttered now or never. Thereafter, every phrase had the same sense of being impelled by an unstoppable inner need.  It was enthralling to hear a well-worn piece so totally re-imagined.” (The Daily Telegraph, August 2011)