Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra

“The orchestra can call itself as one of the world's best this evening, not only because the technical level is stunning, but because it demonstrates genuine character.” (Die Welt, Nov 2015)

Contacts

Rafi Gokay Wol +44 (0)20 3725 9172

Overview

The Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra (RSPO) was founded in 1902 and Konserthuset Stockholm has been its home since 1926. The RSPO performes around 100 concerts annually and also participates in the festivities associated with the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony.

With Sakari Oramo at the helm as Chief Conductor and Artistic Advisor of the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra, HarrisonParrott works closely in partnership in devising a touring strategy that continues to develop their international prestige and renown. Recent projects include visits to the Robeco Festival in 2016, German and Austrian festivals in 2015, a ten-concert tour of Japan and a welcome return to the BBC Proms.

The Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra (RSPO) was founded in 1902 and Konserthuset Stockholm has been its home since 1926. The RSPO performes around 100 concerts annually and also participates in the festivities associated with the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony.

With Sakari Oramo at the helm as Chief Conductor and Artistic Advisor of the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra, HarrisonParrott works closely in partnership in devising a touring strategy that continues to develop their international prestige and renown. Recent projects include visits to the Robeco Festival in 2016, German and Austrian festivals in 2015, a ten-concert tour of Japan and a welcome return to the BBC Proms.

In 2017, we continue to work with RSPO for their March tour to Estonia and their late summer tour to Amsterdam, BBC Proms and Helsinki.

Contacts

Rafi Gokay Wol +44 (0)20 3725 9172

Reviews

“From intricate strumming and subtle percussion unfolded exciting sound of explosions. […]Everyone on the stage from the violinist in the back row, to the solo trumpeter, was part of one big whirl.” (de Volkskrant, August 2016)

“The orchestra mastered the sound culminations, the precise rhythms and the mixtures of musical colours in an excellent manner.” (Kölnische Rundschau, November 2015)

“The rich, dark sound of the orchestra, affected by a resilient weightiness, has its very own profile; without doubt, it is ideal for the violin concerto by Jean Sibelius. […]” (Kölner Stadt-Anzeiger, November 2015)

“From intricate strumming and subtle percussion unfolded exciting sound of explosions. […]Everyone on the stage from the violinist in the back row, to the solo trumpeter, was part of one big whirl.” (de Volkskrant, August 2016)

“The orchestra mastered the sound culminations, the precise rhythms and the mixtures of musical colours in an excellent manner.” (Kölnische Rundschau, November 2015)

“The rich, dark sound of the orchestra, affected by a resilient weightiness, has its very own profile; without doubt, it is ideal for the violin concerto by Jean Sibelius. […]” (Kölner Stadt-Anzeiger, November 2015)

“The musicians from Stockholm played the [Mouvement symphonique No 2] dynamically more differentiated than one is used to.” (Der Bund, March 2015)

“By their applause the audience showed such great enthusiams that the Finish conductor Sakari Oramo and the soloist Patricia Kopatchinskaja […] played an encore together on their violins. ... The fantastic RSPO and the outstanding soloist created a pleasurable and atmospheric beginning of spring.“ (European News Agency, March 2015)

“Together with its chief conductor, the Finn Sakari Oramo, the orchestra presented nothing less than a musically finest hour. ... The full sound of this orchestra is phenomenally compact, balanced the ability of each register, perfectly homogenous the sound of the strings- the latter thanks to the noticeably intense cooperation of the principals. Oramo conducted with a clear marking, subtly tarred the mixtures of sounds and was able to present the individual pieces also structurally very clear. Jean Sibelius’ demanding first Symphony in E Minor was completely rounded; under Oramo’s empathetic guidance the orchestra let the moving quality of the sound flow without hindrance. Despite the extremely passionate way of playing the score’s details have not been overseen; a surprising palette of moods and dynamic shading was experienceable, one could only be astonished at the easiness and accuracy of this interpretation.” (Neue Züricher Zeitung, March 2015)

“Sakari Oramo holds everything together, somehow. Brilliant how the Finish conductor and his orchestra accompany the soloist at eye level on her adventurous paths- alert, agile and also sometimes with pleasure of the doughty sound-thunder.” (Berner Zeitung, March 2015)

“The performances have an irresistible momentum. The opening movement of the Fourth, the Inextinguishable, is thrillingly urgent without ever sounding forced or rushed, and its slow movement grows naturally and inevitably to its apotheosis. The Fifth seems equally coherent; every facet of its tumultuous opening movement is carefully controlled and precisely paced, the second movement is joyously affirmative. In both symphonies the Stockholm orchestra responds wonderfully too.” (Andrew Clements, The Guardian, February 2014)

“There’s no intrinsic reason why love of Elgar’s music should be confined to this country, and his greatest scores seem at last to be taking root abroad, as this splendid disc testifies. The Stockholm players seize the Second Symphony’s fabulous orchestral opportunities with relish and subtlety, and their Finnish conductor has an understanding at once individual and profound of its rich ambiguities. Sakari Oramo catches the sadness at the core of the first movement’s opening bravura and draws out beautifully its mysterious middle section. The wonderful Larghetto is a joy, the scherzo suitably wild and scary, and the performance ends in the right resigned, wistful glow.” (David Cairns, The Sunday Times, August 2013)

"Apart from the tumult, which was thoroughly enjoyed by the orchestra, the ‘Firebird’ shows the wonderful, almost magical, delicate pages in dazzling instrumental colours – a great opportunity for the orchestra to demonstrate its sophistication. Oramo structured the music precisely and at a pace, savouring the energy of the movement, as well as the richness of colour. At the end, as if liberated, the busy horns emerge from this fairy tale." (Frankfurter Neue Presse, February 2012)

“The Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra is on splendid form throughout, led by conductors who have championed these works at home and abroad.“ (Gramophone, January 2012)

“And the orchestra seemed wired to his every move. I’ve never heard such an exciting or compelling performance of Nielsen’s Symphony No 4, The Inextinguishable – the symphony with the duelling timpani, and certainly inextinguishable on Monday night…The finesse of the Stockholm players helped see to that; whether the sounds came from juddering strings or the second movement’s bucolic winds, they steered clear of the brash, and were always exquisitely voiced… Sensuous strings led the way into a wondrous journey of discovery, with motifs, textures, keys and colours constantly mutating, constantly surprising. (The Arts Desk, August 2011)

“Oramo and his players drew out from the composer’s score the innermost movements and patternings of nature itself, deeply absorbed into Sibelius’s composing consciousness not as mere pictorialism, but as an abstract, energising force… Oramo fused the plucking, pulsing minimalist energies of the work with a sweet and gentle lyricism, strings wonderfully supple, woodwind tempering their sweetness with a slight astringency.”(The Times, August 2011)

“From the very beginning, Oramo made the smooth string sound tremble with an inner tension... The scherzo, played with beautiful lightness by the orchestra, flitted past us at a ghostly gallop, the balanced phrases of the finale yielding eventually to a storm… This marvellous performance was undoubtedly the evening’s highlight, but the orchestra’s deftness and beautifully blended tone was a constant delight in the other two pieces.”(The Telegraph, August 2011)