Nicole Cabell
Soprano

“Nicole Cabell gave a fabulous performance [as Alcina]…her tone was rounded and silky, projected with ease, immaculately controlled and finely nuanced.” (Opera Magazine, June 2016)

Contacts

Ian Stones +44 (0)20 3725 9104
Georgina Wheatley +44 (0)20 3725 9185

Biography

This season, Nicole Cabell debuts at Dutch National Opera as Flavia in Cavalli’s Eliogabalo under Leonardo García Alarcón, in the highly praised Thomas Jolly production from Paris, returns to Grand Théâtre de Genève as Contessa Almaviva (Le nozze di Figaro) and performs Bernstein’s A White House Cantata with Wayne Marshall and Radio Filharmonisch Orkest as part of the composer’s anniversary year. Away from the operatic stage, Nicole Cabell debuts at Oper Frankfurt in recital, accompanied by Simon Lepper.

This season, Nicole Cabell debuts at Dutch National Opera as Flavia in Cavalli’s Eliogabalo under Leonardo García Alarcón, in the highly praised Thomas Jolly production from Paris, returns to Grand Théâtre de Genève as Contessa Almaviva (Le nozze di Figaro) and performs Bernstein’s A White House Cantata with Wayne Marshall and Radio Filharmonisch Orkest as part of the composer’s anniversary year. Away from the operatic stage, Nicole Cabell debuts at Oper Frankfurt in recital, accompanied by Simon Lepper. 

An incredibly versatile artist, in recent seasons Nicole has given a universally acclaimed company and role debut as Alcina in Geneva alongside appearances in full lyric roles such as Violetta (La traviata) for the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden under Nicola Luisotti, Juliette (Roméo et Juliette) for Atlanta Opera and Mimì (La bohème) for both her debut at Opéra national de Paris and at Cincinnati Opera under Louis Langrée. Most recently, Nicole added Bess (Porgy and Bess) to her repertoire with Sydney Symphony Orchestra under David Robertson. 

Showcasing her pre-eminence in the music of Mozart, Nicole has sung Pamina (Die Zauberflöte) at the Lyric Opera of Chicago, and Donna Elvira (Don Giovanni) in Tokyo and for the Quincena Festival in Spain, as well as Contessa Almaviva at Angers Nantes Opéra and in Montréal. Nicole reprises Contessa Almviva at Michigan Opera Theater this season.

Nicole Cabell took first prize at BBC Cardiff Singer of the World in 2005.

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Contacts

Ian Stones +44 (0)20 3725 9104
Georgina Wheatley +44 (0)20 3725 9185

Reviews

“After her resounding success as Alcina here, the American soprano Nicole Cabell provides pure enchantment as the Countessa, and one can only revel in her elegance and admirable line. After a moving “Porgi amor”, she delivers “Dove sono” full of poignant nostalgia.” (Opera Online, September 2017) 

“Nicole Cabell brings her signature warm, amber-hued timbre to the Countess, demonstrating sincere melancholy in the arias and breathing life into the recitatives. Her miraculous intonation in “Porgi amor” retained a sublime moment, and “Dove sono” was moving and sung with true legato. The emotion was palpable, especially in the pianissimi.” (Forum Opéra, September 2017)

“The true star of the evening was the Contessa of Nicole Cabell: she is radiant onstage, with a warm timbre, very clear text, and a characterisation free of ostentation. Her “Porgi amor” was a true delight with extraordinary line, and perfectly expressing the complexity of the character” (Bachtrack, September 2017)

“After her resounding success as Alcina here, the American soprano Nicole Cabell provides pure enchantment as the Countessa, and one can only revel in her elegance and admirable line. After a moving “Porgi amor”, she delivers “Dove sono” full of poignant nostalgia.” (Opera Online, September 2017) 

“Nicole Cabell brings her signature warm, amber-hued timbre to the Countess, demonstrating sincere melancholy in the arias and breathing life into the recitatives. Her miraculous intonation in “Porgi amor” retained a sublime moment, and “Dove sono” was moving and sung with true legato. The emotion was palpable, especially in the pianissimi.” (Forum Opéra, September 2017)

“The true star of the evening was the Contessa of Nicole Cabell: she is radiant onstage, with a warm timbre, very clear text, and a characterisation free of ostentation. Her “Porgi amor” was a true delight with extraordinary line, and perfectly expressing the complexity of the character” (Bachtrack, September 2017)

“Cabell sang and acted an impassioned Mimì, her big lyric soprano voice soaring when soaring was needed” (Cincinnati Inquirer, June 2017)

“Nicole Cabell is exquisite in her many contributions, her creamy soprano soaring in the sublime Prière” (BBC Music Magazine, June 2017)

“His ill-fated amour, Mimi, was given an engaging portrayal by Nicole Cabell, who employed a rich and subtle soprano voice throughout her ample range.” (Twin Cities Pioneer Press, May 2017)

“In a star performance, Nicole Cabell delights and intrigues throughout as a lovely Juliet. The scene in which she drinks Friar Laurence’s draught has a breath-taking sense of intensity and clarity.” (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, May 2016)

“Nicole Cabell gave a fabulous performance in the title role. For a start, she looked superb, thanks to her height and imperious elegance…Cabell also proved an actress of substance, giving precise and unexaggerated expression to the sorceress’s wide-ranging emotions as she found her powers of attraction gradually waning. Above all her singing was admirable, even if it did not conform to the aesthetic that has come to typify Baroque opera: her tone was rounded and silky, projected with ease, immaculately controlled and finely nuanced.” (Opera Magazine, June 2016)

“Best of all was the Alcina of Nicole Cabell. She is the real thing, a superb lyrical soprano…She phrases generously, was capable of a genuine dramatic presence in her “Ombre pallide,” and was greatly moving in the final “Mi restano le lagrime”.” (Seen & Heard, February 2016)

“Nicole Cabell’s Alcina was by far the superlative element of the evening: she is ready to make sacrifices to prove her love for Ruggiero, weeping in “Ah mio cor”, her voice carries the text as well as the emotion like no other performer on the stage. Her gaze ignites the stage and fully embodies a woman torn between love and revenge. Her aria “Ah Ruggiero crudel…Ombre pallide” was splendid and, despite her powers, Alcina is still a real woman who feels pain and love’s despair” (Bachtrack, February 2016) 

“When she first enters, Nicole Cabell’s Alcina strikes a strong figure on stage, bringing a majestic voice and stage presence. With a sensual timbre, this soprano gives her character a variety of colours and a rare intensity.” (Le Courrier, February 2016)

“In the title role, Nicole Cabell impresses with a smooth timbre throughout her range and a lovely roundness to the voice (particularly convincing in “Ah mio cor”).” (24 heures, February 2016)

“Nicole Cabell is a true diva…Thanks to her rich voice, full of colour and convincing stage presence. He “Si, son quella” was full of emotional nuance” (Forum Opéra, February 2016) 

“Nicole Cabell interpreted Alcina masterfully…With her velvety voice, she succeeds in inciting sympathy from the audience for the heroine who brings about her own demise.” (Opernnetz, February 2016)

“Soprano Nicole Cabell brought more uninhibited emotionalism to the stage, marrying vocal sweetness and strength in appealing fashion.” (Detroit Free Press, October 2015)

“with a gloriously smoky middle register that effortlessly stretches up to the top extension of her voice.” (BBC Music Magazine, February 2015)

“Nicole Cabell, acting up a storm and giving meaning to every word, sings ravishingly and sadly as Giulietta, spinning out Bellini’s long lines, with a voice somewhat grander than one normally hears in this music…we get a gorgeous trill to boot, all delivered in luxurious tone.” (International Record Review, February 2015)

“Cabell clearly enjoys bringing a bouncy girlishness to Adina, enthusiastically embracing the comic spirit that permeates the production. And Cabell glides smoothly around the outer reaches of her register, as impressively rich in her lower range as in her soaring high notes.” (Pioneer Press, January 2015)

“On November 16 along came Violetta and stole the opening season. The primary reason – though not the only one – was the glorious singing and acting of Nicole Cabell; she cuts a swanky figure on stage and sings with gusto, accuracy and fire.” (Michael H Margolin, Opera, April 2014)

"The soprano Nicole Cabell wielded her voice to evocative effect in “Heaven” and “Almighty God has those Angels,” in which her voice soared above the chorus at the end of that piece." (Vivien Schweitzer, New York Times, March 2014)

"Nicole Cabell - the still, serious centre amid the bustle, dazzle and multiple echoes of songs that Poulenc wrote 20 years earlier, Fêtes galantes and Deux poèmes de Louis Aragon — her voice gleaming and ardent." (Anna Picard, The Times, February 2014)

"Nicole Cabell made a striking debut in the challenging role of Violetta, drawing a portrait of a fallen woman with a rich inner life through vibrant singing and animated acting. What was best about Cabell was how thoroughly she inhabited the role […] She captured the vivacious spirit of a woman who won’t be tied down in the fireworks of “Sempre libera,” and then slowly morphed into the world-weary wisdom of a woman who understands full dimensions of love. Her voice was strong, agile and plush."  (Mark Stryker, Detroit Free Press, November 2013)

“Nicole is riveting in her opening aria (“Oh! quante volte”), in which she mourns her plight while marveling in the beauty of her wedding dress. With power and control over a wide range, her voice has a dazzling clarity, even muscularity, and her movements and expressions slide easily through emotions large and small. She is even more compelling in her beautiful, almost Verdian Act 2 aria, “Morte io non temo, il sai,” one of Bellini’s finest lyrical moments.” (KC independent, September 2013)

"In purity, roundedness and overall beauty, hers is among the most alluring voices around" (Opera Magazine, October 2012)

“Cabell, in her company debut, brought tonal clarity and eloquent phrasing to the role of Juliet - never more touchingly than in the expansive romance with which she begins her assignment” (San Francisco Chronicle, September 2012)

“Cabell, too, sang beautifully. Her duets with DiDonato were a special high point, their voices blending almost as magically as the fabled duo of Joan Sutherland and Marilyn Horne (or, later in their careers, Montserrat Caballé, and Horne). She also joined DiDonato in showing a fine understanding of bel canto nuance and shading, and sang with increasing elasticity as the night progressed” (San Francisco Classical Voice, September 2012)

“In her company debut, Cabell brings a luscious, dark, and voluminous soprano with plenty of spin to Giulietta, the kind of voice more often found in Puccini than in bel canto. She executed Giulietta’s music with the requisite grace and pathos, not to mention a beautiful trill and fine high notes” (The Classical Review, September 2012)

“Nicole Cabell was born to sing the role of Leila. Her charismatic presence proved ideal for the mysterious priestess whose exotic beauty sparks turmoil between Nadir and Zurga... Cabell sings from the heart and with that gorgeous voice, carries us right along with her.” (The Classical Review, August 2012)

“As the virgin priestess Leila, soprano Nicole Cabell is simply radiant, floating exquisite high notes and trilling to perfection.” (Associated Press, August 5, 2012)

“The standout on Tuesday was Nicole Cabell as the conflicted priestess, Leila. She is the much-longed-for lyric coloratura soprano with a burnished creamy sound. Her voice is textbook bel canto perfectly placed and the softest sound projected clearly to the very back of the hall. As I listened to her perfect yet impassioned singing in tuneful but still early Bizet, I couldn't help but make a list of meaty roles I would love to hear her sing.” (TheaterJones, August 2012)

“Distinguished singing inhabits this production. Leïla is portrayed by soprano Nicole Cabell, whose lush, velvety tone suggests the covered richness of a mezzo-soprano — a balance of pitch and timbre that fits French repertoire especially well...When she turned from vestal virgin to love interest, however, she secreted a potent sensuality that rivaled the steaminess of her tropical surroundings, and she spun out the long lines of her big aria with supple allure.” (The New Mexican, July 2012)

“Cabell sings like an angel—not one of the pallid, fluttery persuasion that gets mislabeled ‘the French style,’ but with warmth and full-throated ease, undaunted by the florid fillips the role insists upon. For an object lesson in graceful vocal purity, just pay attention to Cabell’s dreamy second-act aria, ‘Comme autrefois dans la nuit sombre.”(Santa Fe Reporter, July 2012)