Budapest Festival Orchestra

“There is no other ensemble in the world like the Budapest Festival Orchestra.” (Evening Standard)

Contacts

Rafi Gokay Wol +44 (0)20 3725 9172

Overview

The Budapest Festival Orchestra was founded by Iván Fischer over 25 years ago and has created an outstanding reputation for itself through its recordings and international tours.

HarrisonParrott enjoys a long-standing and ongoing collaboration with this acclaimed partnership working together on touring projects in Europe, USA and in South America. Under the auspices of HarrisonParrott, the BFO and Iván Fischer have appeared numerous times at the BBC Proms and Edinburgh International Festival as well as US and Canadian summer festivals including Mostly Mozart, New York.

The Budapest Festival Orchestra was founded by Iván Fischer over 25 years ago and has created an outstanding reputation for itself through its recordings and international tours.

HarrisonParrott enjoys a long-standing and ongoing collaboration with this acclaimed partnership working together on touring projects in Europe, USA and in South America. Under the auspices of HarrisonParrott, the BFO and Iván Fischer have appeared numerous times at the BBC Proms and Edinburgh International Festival as well as US and Canadian summer festivals including Mostly Mozart, New York.

HarrisonParrott arranged the BFO and Ivan Fischer's debut tour to South America in September 2003; such was their success that they have returned three times since, in April 2007, May 2011 and most recently in June 2015. During the 2010/11 season, HarrisonParrott arranged a three-concert tour of Scandinavia for the BFO and Fischer with pianist Emmanuel Ax. The orchestra also toured twice in Athens in November 2013 and 2015.

Contacts

Rafi Gokay Wol +44 (0)20 3725 9172

Reviews

"The great partnership of Iván Fischer and his Budapest players make music of supreme intimacy and vitality. They endow the work with a poise and lyricism too often sacrificed in favour of frenzied intensity." (Fiona Maddocks, The Guardian, November 2013)

“Fischer’s elite band have already displayed superb Mahlerian credentials. This lovely account of the First, with its allusions to Songs of a Wayfarer, Mahler’s early vocal masterpiece, and homage, in the “stormy” finale, to that of Beethoven’s Ninth, is especially remarkable in Fischer’s delicate, chamber-like intimacy in repose and his lilting, rustic way with the Ländler-like dance rhythms.” (The Times, August 2012)

“The Rite of

...

"The great partnership of Iván Fischer and his Budapest players make music of supreme intimacy and vitality. They endow the work with a poise and lyricism too often sacrificed in favour of frenzied intensity." (Fiona Maddocks, The Guardian, November 2013)

“Fischer’s elite band have already displayed superb Mahlerian credentials. This lovely account of the First, with its allusions to Songs of a Wayfarer, Mahler’s early vocal masterpiece, and homage, in the “stormy” finale, to that of Beethoven’s Ninth, is especially remarkable in Fischer’s delicate, chamber-like intimacy in repose and his lilting, rustic way with the Ländler-like dance rhythms.” (The Times, August 2012)

“The Rite of Spring remains a seismic event in the history of music, still astounding in a performance as gripping and as powerful as this live account by Fischer’s BFO. These Hungarians manage the remarkable feat of making this familiar music sound ever fresh and new — I love Fischer’s chamber-music textures in Dances of the Adolescent Girls, and his Dance of the Earth sounds positively volcanic...It is ravishingly played" (The Sunday Times, February 2012)

"..Iván Fischer's beautifully judged and lucidly presented performance takes the work's length as something utterly inevitable and authentically Schubertian in its own right. The textures are wonderfully transparent, and by getting his players in the Budapest orchestra to use natural horns, narrow bore trombones and clarinets in C, he gives an extra buoyancy to the sound, so that every line has its own character and rhythmic profile". (The Guardian, June 2011)

“The first thing that hits you when hearing them live is their incredible purity of sound, which is perfectly blended and has an almost overwhelming impact.” (Revista Noticias, May 2011)

“The musicality of these Hungarians from Budapest was something rare.  Each phrase was performed with a beginning, middle and end, with such fluency, with the musicians overcoming all technical barriers, and with the remarkable majesty of Maestro Fischer.  It was everything that is required from a first class orchestra.” (O Estado de Sao Paulo, May 2011)

“The strings are quite simply stunning but even then it’s impossible to say that this section is better than any of the others.” (Espectáculos, May 2011)

"The Hungarian orchestra delivered a truly masterful performance of Stravinsky's violent ballet score... Iván Fischer's dynamic shifts in mood and pace, the confident horns, the precise pizzicatos in the violin and the tight woodwinds' easy, creamy quality; was altogether fantastic." (Politiken.dk, December 2010)

"After the interval, during Haydn’s Oxford Symphony, Fischer seemingly required little effort to inspire his orchestra. His small gestures reflect the mutual understanding of 27 years of working together. It was in the last piece, The Firebird Suite by Stravinsky, that the programme moved away from "chatty", "witty" conversation and returned to a more dramatic dimension. Even during this opulent masterpiece, the interpretation retained both the diligence of chamber music as well as musical finesse. It was world class." (Hamburger Abendblatt, December 2010)

“This is one of those magnificent performances, typical of Ivan Fischer, that offer so much. Some will take from it a sense of elegance and sweetness. For me it's the detail - the concentration of every moment in the strings, for instance. You can almost focus on a different instrument for each listening and experience different yet satisfying musical journeys, as it were. Marvellous music - making.” (Gramophone, September 2010)

“Once again the sheer power of the Budapest players took the breath away...The precision, power and beauty of the playing matched, and in some places, surpassed, most of the great Wagner orchestras from the present and past...Bayreuth included. Praise enough!” (The Scotsman)