Paavo Järvi
Conductor

“Järvi clearly prizes highly charged music making, often at top speed, with thoughtful phrasing and sharply punched accents… these qualities yield refreshing, powerful performances.” (New York Times)

Contacts

Jasper Parrott +44 (0)20 7229 9166
Teodora Masi +44 (0)20 3725 9189
Alice O'Reilly +44 (0)20 3725 9103

Biography

Artistic Director: Die Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen
Chief Conductor: NHK Symphony Orchestra
Chief Conductor and Music Director Designate: Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich (from (2019/20 season)
Conductor Laureate: Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra
Music Director Laureate: Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra
Artistic Advisor: Pärnu Music Festival and Järvi Academy
Artistic Director: Estonian Festival Orchestra
Artistic Advisor: Estonian National Symphony Orchestra

 

The Estonian conductor Paavo Järvi opens his third season as Chief Conductor of the NHK Symphony Orchestra, presenting repertoire ranging from Mozart to Bernstein. Their highly acclaimed Strauss recording project continues with the release of the second album featuring Don QuixoteTill Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche and Der Rosenkavalier Suite. As Artistic Director of The Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen, he continues the critically acclaimed Brahms Symphonies cycle and launches their Schubert project touring in Europe.  

Commencing from the 2019/20 season Paavo Järvi will be Chief Conductor and Music Director of the Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich, while he concluded his highly successful tenure as Music Director of the Orchestre de Paris in summer 2016. He is also Conductor Laureate of Frankfurt Radio Symphony and Music Director Laureate of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. In addition to his permanent positions, Järvi is in much demand as a guest conductor, appearing regularly with the Berliner Philharmoniker, Münchner Philharmoniker, London’s Philharmonia Orchestra, Staatskapelle Berlin and Staatskapelle Dresden. Highlights of his recent and upcoming guest engagements include the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Wiener Philharmoniker, New York Philharmonic, Teatro alla Scala in Milan and NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchester.  

Artistic Director: Die Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen
Chief Conductor: NHK Symphony Orchestra
Chief Conductor and Music Director Designate: Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich (from (2019/20 season)
Conductor Laureate: Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra
Music Director Laureate: Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra
Artistic Advisor: Pärnu Music Festival and Järvi Academy
Artistic Director: Estonian Festival Orchestra
Artistic Advisor: Estonian National Symphony Orchestra

 

The Estonian conductor Paavo Järvi opens his third season as Chief Conductor of the NHK Symphony Orchestra, presenting repertoire ranging from Mozart to Bernstein. Their highly acclaimed Strauss recording project continues with the release of the second album featuring Don Quixote, Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche and Der Rosenkavalier Suite. As Artistic Director of The Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen, he continues the critically acclaimed Brahms Symphonies cycle and launches their Schubert project touring in Europe.  

Commencing from the 2019/20 season Paavo Järvi will be Chief Conductor and Music Director of the Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich, while he concluded his highly successful tenure as Music Director of the Orchestre de Paris in summer 2016. He is also Conductor Laureate of Frankfurt Radio Symphony and Music Director Laureate of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. In addition to his permanent positions, Järvi is in much demand as a guest conductor, appearing regularly with the Berliner Philharmoniker, Münchner Philharmoniker, London’s Philharmonia Orchestra, Staatskapelle Berlin and Staatskapelle Dresden. Highlights of his recent and upcoming guest engagements include the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Wiener Philharmoniker, New York Philharmonic, Teatro alla Scala in Milan and NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchester.   

Paavo Järvi is a dedicated supporter of Estonian composers and Artistic Adviser to the Estonian National Symphony Orchestra. Each season concludes with a week of performances and master-classes at the Pärnu Music Festival in Estonia, which he founded in 2010. As a festival celebrating the orchestra at its heart, Paavo Järvi created a new ensemble which has become the uncontested highlight of the summer season: the Estonian Festival Orchestra, which he takes to Europe’s major capital cities for a tour that coincides with the 100th Anniversary of Estonian Independence in January 2018. Paavo Järvi was awarded the Order of the White Star by the President of Estonia in 2013 for his outstanding contribution to Estonian culture.

With an extensive discography, Paavo Järvi has won a Grammy Award for his recording of Sibelius’ Cantatas and was named Artist of the Year by both Gramophone and Diapason Magazines. He has also been appointed Commandeur de L’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Ministry of Culture, for his contribution to music in France.

Born in Tallinn, Estonia, Paavo Järvi studied Percussion and Conducting at the Tallinn School of Music. In 1980, he moved to the USA where he continued his studies at the Curtis Institute of Music and at the Los Angeles Philharmonic Institute with Leonard Bernstein.

 

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Contacts

Jasper Parrott +44 (0)20 7229 9166
Teodora Masi +44 (0)20 3725 9189
Alice O'Reilly +44 (0)20 3725 9103

Reviews

“The superb pianist Leif Ove Andsnes, who has played and recorded the Rachmaninoff concertos to acclaim, has made a special cause of this curious Fourth. He brought it to David Geffen Hall on Thursday to kick off his season as artist in residence with the New York Philharmonic, and gave a revelatory account of the piece with the conductor Paavo Jarvi … Mr. Andsnes’s performance was so animated and effortless that the music sounded almost lucid. Mr. Jarvi matched his exuberance right through, drawing bright, crisp playing from the orchestra … He opened his welcome return to the Philharmonic with a dazzling performance of Esa-Pekka Salonen’s overturelike “Gambit,” in its New York premiere.” (New York Times, Anthony Tommasini, October 2017) 

“Järvi and the Philharmonic concluded the evening with Sibelius’ Fifth Symphony, and it's evident that the New York Philharmonic horn section has never sounded better … Järvi led an exceptional performance of the symphony, highlighting the work’s dramatic, film score-like qualities and pacing the final chords with mature restraint.” (Bachtrack.com, Jacob Slattery, October 2017) 

“Järvi captured Sibelius* unique and powerful sense of time. On top, the music flowed and expanded, it looked out at the changing world around it. Underneath, the internal foundation rotated on its axis, meditating on memories and imagination. This was deeply evocative and true to Sibelius’ art” (New York Classical Review, George Grella, October 2017) 

“Paavo Järvi led a finely-wrought, vibrant and well-balanced performance (of Salonen’s ‘Gambit’) … In a taut, intense reading, Andsnes and Järvi – perfectly in sync – relentlessly drove the music (in Rachmaninov’s Piano Concerto No.4) to a stupendous climax, energy and tension maintained to the end.” (Classicalsource.com, Lewis M Smoley, October 2017)

“The superb pianist Leif Ove Andsnes, who has played and recorded the Rachmaninoff concertos to acclaim, has made a special cause of this curious Fourth. He brought it to David Geffen Hall on Thursday to kick off his season as artist in residence with the New York Philharmonic, and gave a revelatory account of the piece with the conductor Paavo Jarvi … Mr. Andsnes’s performance was so animated and effortless that the music sounded almost lucid. Mr. Jarvi matched his exuberance right through, drawing bright, crisp playing from the orchestra … He opened his welcome return to the Philharmonic with a dazzling performance of Esa-Pekka Salonen’s overturelike “Gambit,” in its New York premiere.” (New York Times, Anthony Tommasini, October 2017) 

“Järvi and the Philharmonic concluded the evening with Sibelius’ Fifth Symphony, and it's evident that the New York Philharmonic horn section has never sounded better … Järvi led an exceptional performance of the symphony, highlighting the work’s dramatic, film score-like qualities and pacing the final chords with mature restraint.” (Bachtrack.com, Jacob Slattery, October 2017) 

“Järvi captured Sibelius* unique and powerful sense of time. On top, the music flowed and expanded, it looked out at the changing world around it. Underneath, the internal foundation rotated on its axis, meditating on memories and imagination. This was deeply evocative and true to Sibelius’ art” (New York Classical Review, George Grella, October 2017) 

“Paavo Järvi led a finely-wrought, vibrant and well-balanced performance (of Salonen’s ‘Gambit’) … In a taut, intense reading, Andsnes and Järvi – perfectly in sync – relentlessly drove the music (in Rachmaninov’s Piano Concerto No.4) to a stupendous climax, energy and tension maintained to the end.” (Classicalsource.com, Lewis M Smoley, October 2017)

“… The Sibelius symphony (no. 2) showed an orchestra with a nerve and willingness to play all the way … the energy and cohesion to create an uncontrollable and direct symphonic world that hits right in the diaphragm.” (Politiken, Henrik Friis, August 2017) 

“The rich program of the Pärnu Music Festival reflects the human concept that the conductor Paavo Järvi embodies as its guiding spirit … Under his unpretentious, collegial, always professional direction, the ensemble is thus imbued with the spirit of the Lucerne Festival Orchestra – and is already of an amazing standard." (Die Presse,Walter Weidringer, August 2017)

"The NHK Symphony Orchestra Tokyo surprise with a blazing virtuosity in Shostakovich. Chief conductor Paavo Järvi smuggles the Japanese into the top league … There was no sign of an empty chair in the Great Hall.… the triumph of a dream team… The strings created a glow that connoisseurs usually associate with the Vienna Philharmonic …" (Volkskrant, March 2017)  

"The second of the Staatskapelle Berlin’s subscription programmes of the season was memorable in many ways. Primarily this was for a towering account of Shostakovich’s “Leningrad” Symphony, whose long course from ironic semi-darkness to ambiguous light was charted with complete control by Paavo Järvi … In fact, Järvi is probably just the sort of conductor you want in this work if it's not to spiral out of control … Against a controlled background, the big moments, such as the grand Mahlerian outburst in the Adagio, registered with especial power. The gradual build-up to the finale’s concluding climax was irresistible, too, while the transparency of the Staatskapelle’s playing helped elucidate the work’s symphonic logic …  it’s difficult to imagine a more musical account of this great symphonic edifice." (Hugo Shirley, Bachtrack, November 2016)

“And the Estonian conductor Paavo Järvi? He makes the Staatskapelle Berlin sound completely different. His Beethoven sounds like mature Mozart rather than late Brahms.  It is historically informed and confidently tailored to the traditional symphony orchestra. It is a Beethoven with vibrato-less strings and earthy winds, a Beethoven of high transparency and attractive expressivity. … Paavo Järvi's interpretation (of Shostakovich’s Leningrad Symphony) can now be regarded as a counter-proof … It is astonishing how long Järvi manages to spin out the main theme in all its beauty and balance - which makes the mood more violent in its warlike madness. Still more surprising, however, with what self-conviction he can demand the musical tension and surrender of the musicians in the other movements.” (Felix Stephan, Der Morgenpost, November 2016)

“The second of the Staatskapelle Berlin’s subscription programmes of the season was memorable in many ways. Primarily this was for a towering account of Shostakovich’s “Leningrad” Symphony, whose long course from ironic semi-darkness to ambiguous light was charted with complete control by Paavo Järvi … In fact, Järvi is probably just the sort of conductor you want in this work if it's not to spiral out of control … Against a controlled background, the big moments, such as the grand Mahlerian outburst in the Adagio, registered with especial power. The gradual build-up to the finale’s concluding climax was irresistible, too, while the transparency of the Staatskapelle’s playing helped elucidate the work’s symphonic logic …  it’s difficult to imagine a more musical account of this great symphonic edifice.” (Hugo Shirley, Bachtrack, November 2016)

“Absolute precision, full-bodied sound, a lethal punch — this sterling performance rejoiced in them all, right from the turbulent opening bars … Sharpness of character was the special glory of Järvi’s tour around the temperaments. The Phlegmatic movement hovered in his hands with delicious sluggishness. Impetuous anger raced through the Choleric opening allegro, the mirror of the introspective Melancholic adagio. Shoulder movements reached their height in the Sanguine finale’s reckless high spirits, punctured towards the end with slow and sad reminiscences, beautifully engineered.” (Geoff Brown, The Times, November 2016)

“With the Pärnu Music Festival Paavo Järvi creates competition for Europe … This is highly concentrated music making (from the Estonian Festival Orchestra), all the details are worked out: the ping pong of accents between violins and horns, antiphons between the woodwind groups, targeted focus curves in the second violins. Nothing is sweeping, nothing sleepy and nothing washed away.” (Jan Brachmann, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, July 2016)

“Pärnu: What many festivals dream of achieving is self-evident here… The central mentors are Neeme and Paavo Järvi, father and son. The Järvi Academy offers conducting masterclasses to students from around the world and the Estonian Festival Orchestra, a new first class ensemble, brings together professional musicians from the whole of Europe and top players from Estonia, creating a musical entity which was received with standing ovations for their performances of Sibelius, Nielsen and Shostakovich: pure astonishment for this extraordinary collective music making … in an atmosphere of fun, openness and curiosity.” (Ursula Magnes, Klassik Radio, July 2016)

“Nielsen’s Symphony no. 3 "unfolded naturally, with Jarvi keeping a weather eye on momentum, and allowing that glorious waltz tune near the end of the first movement to emerge triumphantly. The Andante was rendered sympathetically, its cloudless tranquillity beautifully evoked by smooth horns and warm-toned strings.” (Bachtrack, May 2016)

“Echoing the symphony’s soubriquet, Järvi’s gestures were themselves expansive – he is a conductor who makes full use of the space around him – and the orchestra responded perfectly, presenting wonderful warm string passages, enchantingly twittering woodwind birdsong, and powerful brass counterpoint.” (Music OMH, May 2016) 

“Ma Vlast” presented at the opening concert of the Prague Spring and on the podium before the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra was Paavo Järvi. In the Smetana Hall and with Smetana's music there was something new. It was both innovative and traditional, interesting and satisfactory. Rich and, most importantly, without any sense of routine .. The Philharmonic played extremely cultivated and sophisticatedly, repeatedly and willingly going into great expressive intensity. “My Vlast” sounded as beautiful music, without excessive pathos, with clear contours and soft tones …” (Harmonie Online, May 2016) 

“Steven Isserlis made a fine, fierce recording of the Elgar Cello Concerto with the LSO 18 years ago; this new version, with the Philharmonia and conductor Paavo Järvi, is fiercer still – older, wiser and even more convincing. Isserlis’s cello rages against the dying of the light, sounding angry yet still beautiful, and under Järvi the orchestra is full-bodied but focused … ” (The Guardian, May 2016)

“He—and Paavo Järvi—steer a course between the astringent dynamism of Elgar's own reading, tender intimacy and the grand passion of Jacqueline du Pré. Ensemble is hand-in-glove, wind solos eloquent. The scherzo has plenty of attack, the Adagio is almost unbearably poignant while Isserlis's finale explodes into life with a bristling humour and rhythmic vitality all-too rare.” (BBC Music Magazine, May 2016)

“He is also blessed in having such a scrupulously attentive partner as Paavo Järvi, who procures playing of the very highest quality from the Philharmonia.” (Gramophone, May 2016)

“The glorious waltz at the heart of the Espansiva’s opening movement is intoxicating, and Järvi gets the tempo exactly right in the finale. The sudden collapse of momentum in No. 2’s last movement is brilliantly managed, and I’ve had Järvi’s exuberant performance of Nielsen’s First playing on a loop: perky, characterful winds and shrewdly chosen speeds give the scherzo a delicious lilt. No. 6 is the most enigmatic: the playing is phenomenal, the first movement’s terrible climax a real shocker.” (Arts Desk, April 2016)

“Paavo Järvi has just released a new recording with the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra and it has almost become an “historical” high point. With his Estonian musical family roots he has sucked the sound and thought world of the Baltic Seas as if, so to speak, it is his mother’s milk.  What especially distinguishes the recording: A quasi natural empathy with the erratic, sometimes almost childish naitivty, but always built on a masterful craft and understanding of Nielsen …  .. Paavo Järvi and the Frankfurt Symphony Orchestra engage so enthusiastically and selectively in this universe, that you can trust their leadership.” (Udo Badelt, Kulturradio RBB, January 2016)

“Between 2009 and 2013, The Estonian Chief conductor of the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra, Paavo Järvi, performed all six symphonies of the original modern Dane, Nielsen … And for the 150th anniversary of the birth of the composer RCA has released these terrific recordings in a box set. The merit with Paavo Järvi is to be able to sit back as a listener and appreciate the natural spectacle of instrumental sounds, going between restful and contrapuntal rigour … Järvi’s approach and understanding of these works, written between 1891 to 1916, clearly allows the linear structures to emerge, nothing must remain on the surface … We experience a culinary luxurious sound.” (Dr. Ingobert Wahba, Der Neue Merkur, January 2016)

“Järvi represents the role of a sovereign trustee for the art of Carl Nielsen in this symphonic cosmos.” (Der Opernfreund, January 2016)

“…everybody wanted to hear the ‘new’ Brahms, and Maestro and the orchestra met these high expectations. With a precise attention to detail, Paavo Järvi is always able to find in the well known scores not only new ideas, but also a new sound, new phrasing, that's why he is always so interesting to listen to.” (Vedomosti Newspaper, July 2015)

“Paavo Järvi allows the musicians a mostly cheerful approach (in Shostakovich's Symphony No.1) and tightens his interpretation again and again, to suddenly bring the orchestra into a higher voltage. Then, with rumbles and crashes into the rafters of the strings, one has the feeling that Järvi is firmly and quite clearly at the heart of the sound of the Ensemble...” (Berliner Zeitung, May 2015)

“Järvi achieved what is often so difficult to attain with Bruckner - an essential unity, allowing each individual element to be incorporated meaningfully within the spacious architecture, allowing everything to fit organically into each other …  it was a very intelligent, natural interpretation … which was received with great applause.” (Die Presse, April 2015) 

"Paavo Järvi is so well versed - always curious and inspired" (Süddeutsche Zeitung, April 2015)

"At the outset Järvi and the Philharmonia hurled us into the vortex with maximum force. It is possible to take a longer view building more patiently to the first movement’s glorioso climax, but this had conviction in spades and in Nielsen conviction counts for a great deal. It also had genuine finesse... This was a concert to make one realise why one keeps coming back for more." (Classical Source, April 2015)

"Järvi and the Philharmonia captured the white heat of the opening movement presenting us with an uncontained maelstrom of sound.  Järvi synthesised the composite elements into a seamless organic whole, bringing out the angularity of the writing and feelings of disquiet in the more reflective material.  Nielsen’s sonic and harmonic shocks, rhythmic asymmetries and unusual textural collages were all brought thrillingly to life." (Robert Beattie, Seen and Heard International, April 2015)

“Paavo Järvi’s impassioned performance of this craggy yet sweeping masterpiece was the best possible retort to an earlier era that struggled to get it about Nielsen’s individuality and metaphysical drive.” ***** (Martin Kettle, The Guardian, April 2015)

"The orchestra demonstrated their extraordinary ensemble power as Paavo Jarvi expertly pulled everyone together through the complex syncopation and entangled parts to create a clear transparent sound and an interpretation that was articulate and interesting."(Mitsunori Eto, Nikkei Newspaper, December 2014) 

"Järvi, whose conducting was classy, polished and intense, appeared to be executing vibrato midair as he directed the strings, and his elasticity of tempo gave the Third Symphony a vitality that it often lacks." (Ji-youm Kwon, Korea Times, December 2014)

“Any conductor who can persuade a modern orchestra to play Haydn at all — let alone with as much rhythmic verve as the Philharmonia invested in his Symphony No 82, The Bear — deserves to be given a lot more than the time of day. I shall definitely be jumping on the Eurostar in January when Järvi (as music director of the Orchestre de Paris) inaugurates the French capital’s by-all-accounts spectacular new Philharmonie concert hall. London desperately needs to catch up.” (Richard Morrison, The Times, November 2014)

"It really is a bit odd that Paavo Järvi’s name hasn’t been taken up at all in connection to Simon Rattle’s successor at the Philharmonic. The conductor has, until now, seldom appeared as a guest conductor with the orchestra and only as recently as two years ago was he re-invited to perform with them after a long gap. Perhaps Järvi comes across as too unpretentious, too musical; possibly because everything seems a little bit too easy to him. He sparks the public with reliable enthusiasm; and he has an exceptionally wide repertoire from almost all eras, which he serves with exceptionally good taste. This is what was experienced at Monday’s wonderful concert in the Philharmonie with the Staatskapelle. Järvi’s clarity and the orchestra’s silkily soft sound – these complemented the evening beautifully." (Clemens Haustein, Berliner Zeitung, November 2014)

"Strange: At this moment, Schumann and Mozart seem like brothers in spirit. An idea that seems to rub off on Järvi. For he emphasizes the balanced sound of Schumann's "Spring Symphony" after the interval. Without sharp corners or edges, yet with a good dose of humor. The Estonian star of the podium springs and dances, reigns back and carries the music. This is a Schumann, which wants to completely convince you. A Schumann, which does not allow the seated audience to brood on details - because Järvi has already thought about everything. The audience can enthusiastically enjoy." (Felix Stephan, Berliner Morgenpost, November 2014)

"How does he do it? The 51-year-old Estonian gives guest performances with the top orchestras around the world, as he does now with the Berlin Staatskapelle. This vast creative output can only be achieved with iron discipline - and an unshakeable self-confidence. In the sold-out Philharmonie Järvi is showing off his maximum effective conducting style which is both elegant and effective. He creates a transparent sound in Schumann's "Spring Symphony", the music flowing freely and seamlessly from movement to movement. The Maestro does not seem to have any doubts about the score. In his aesthetics the large bow replaces any pauses or shaded moments of soul searching." (Frederik Hanssen, Der Tagespiegel, November 2014)

“What made this performance extraordinary was Mr. Jarvi’s pliant pacing. As the musicologist Walter Frisch writes, “Brahms favored and himself employed considerable elasticity of tempo,” but few now dare the extremes of early-20th-century conductors like Max Fiedler and Wilhelm Furtwängler. Mr. Jarvi did. It’s a brave strategy. One false move can render whole movements incoherent. When it works, when it sounds spontaneous and innate to the music rather than imposed upon it, symphonic development is raised to another level of drama. With risk came reward in this dark, ultimately triumphant reading from Mr. Jarvi and his virtuosic orchestra.” (David Allen, New York Times, August 2014)

"An enthralling outing for Shostakovich 5 in a performance of blazing certainty that made one listen afresh to such a ubiquitous work. Järvi’s thought-through, well prepared and vibrant conducting inspired the Philharmonia to a searing and sensitive response." (Colin Anderson, Classical Source, June 2014)

"Paavo Järvi's Prom with the Orchestre de Paris was a thing of contrasts... it was quite a night. [In Britten's Violin Concerto] Järvi's conducting was all the more remarkable for it's restraint and subtlety and [in Saint-Saëns' Symphony No.3] Järvi also reminded us that beyond the sonic largesse lurks a work of great structural ingenuity and developmental complexity." (Tim Ashley, The Guardian, September 2013)

"The very disciplined Paavo Järvi, current chief conductor of the Parisian orchestra, seems like an excellent fit 
[for the orchestra]... He brought rigour and restraint to both Britten and Arvo Pärt’s Cantus in Memoriam Benjamin Britten, and kept his players bubbling away beautifully during Berlioz’s Le Corsaire.” (Neil Fisher, The Times, September 2013)

“Järvi’s account [of Beethoven’s Coriolan Overture] was of the highest quality, especially in the expressive accents and the purity of timbres. Next came Beethoven’s Fourth Symphony. This piece has a dreamy, tender serenity… which the German orchestra portrayed perfectly. The audience responded enthusiastically, and were rewarded with the brilliant Hungarian Dance No.6 by Brahms. This turned out to be the icing on the cake, performed with the full impact of gypsy passion, yet taking into account the tiniest of dynamic detail.” (El País, Montevideo, August 2013)

“What matters above all is that the performances themselves are truly impressive. Järvi brings out both [the music's] nervous excitement and yearning sensuousness with great understanding, keeping his musicians constantly on their toes and his listeners on the edge of their seats. To hear these accounts is to fall in love with the pieces [Schumann's Symphonies] all over again." [Performance *****] (Misha Donat, BBC Music Magazine, August 2013)

"Järvi’s tempos are astutely judged and his conducting is sufficiently fluid to create a mood of rapt expectancy… The closing section, which the 1919 Suite lifts from the conclusion of the original ballet note for note, invokes a tingle factor which goes off the scale!” (Michael Jameson, International Record Review, July/August 2013)

“His performance of Brahms’ Symphony No.2 exceeded expectations. Here was a reading that was truly inspired, and stunningly played. The audience barely breathed during its four movements, and erupted in lengthy cheering at the conclusion.” (Janelle Gelfand, Cincinnati.com, January 2013)

“The conductor always seems fresh and energetic…. Simple in his approach the result is never boring; rather he is able to make the orchestra play with a fiery energy that resembles blazing lava streams bundling under the concert hall floor.” (Clemens Haustein, Berliner Zeitung, November 2012)

"The performance was fresh and it was full of life force. They showed perfect tempo, dynamic, rhythm and expression of main theme, and their performance made it easy for listeners to understand complex structures of this music. " (Ongakuno Tomo, September 2012)

“Järvi is always animated and alert to the music’s expressive potential: he achieves the best of both worlds. His tempi are swift but never rushed; he runs the cursor along significant inner voices (these are extremely transparent readings), and his judgment of key musical transitions attests to genuine musical intuition…So, an unreserved recommendation.” (Gramophone, March 2012)

“Paavo Järvi’s vision of the music is built on subtle expression… Emotional and cerebral intelligence are harnessed by Paavo Järvi, a musician clearly dedicate to Fauré’s cause. Even the composer’s familiar Pavane, done here with optional chorus and stripped of false sentiment, sounds fresh and new in its classical elegance.” (Classic FM Magazine, December 2011)

“Paavo Järvi's recent recordings of Beethoven's 9th Symphony and Brahms' Ein Deutsches Requiem have demonstrated his ability to marshall grand forces – the latter comparison is most pertinent here, in another beautifully-balanced Requiem of shorter, gentler, Gallic persuasion...But it's Järvi's uncanny knack to somehow derive spiritual uplift from the gloomiest of subjects that most impresses here, a talent tailored to fit such needs.” (Fauré: Requiem, Virgin Classics - The Independent, September 2011)