Christopher Warren-Green
Conductor

“Christopher Warren-Green’s understanding of the music was heard in every bar. He suspended the music between restlessness and elegance, while bringing out the dramatic impulse. [He] created a true piece of magic.” (General-Anzeiger)

Contacts

Jane Brown +44 (0)20 3725 9129
Janet Marsden +44 (0)20 3725 9140

Biography

Music Director & Principal Conductor: London Chamber Orchestra
Music Director: Charlotte Symphony Orchestra


Christopher Warren-Green is Music Director of the Charlotte Symphony in North Carolina and Music Director and Principal Conductor of the London Chamber Orchestra. Working extensively in the US, key North American engagements have included The Philadelphia Orchestra, the Detroit, St. Louis, Toronto, Milwaukee, Seattle and Vancouver symphony orchestras, the Minnesota Orchestra and the National Symphony Orchestra Washington D.C. 

In 2017/18 Warren-Green will take the London Chamber Orchestra to the Enescu Festival in Bucharest in an eclectic programme featuring the Music of Enescu, Benjamin, Mozart and Fitkin. He will also make his debut with the Tampere Philharmonic performing works by Sibelius, Stravinsky and Bartok. Last season he returned to Orchestre National de Belgique, Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and Beethoven Orchester Bonn and he made debuts with the Nashville Symphony and Rochester Philharmonic orchestras. 

Music Director & Principal Conductor: London Chamber Orchestra
Music Director: Charlotte Symphony Orchestra


Christopher Warren-Green is Music Director of the Charlotte Symphony in North Carolina and Music Director and Principal Conductor of the London Chamber Orchestra. Working extensively in the US, key North American engagements have included The Philadelphia Orchestra, the Detroit, St. Louis, Toronto, Milwaukee, Seattle and Vancouver symphony orchestras, the Minnesota Orchestra and the National Symphony Orchestra Washington D.C. 

In 2017/18 Warren-Green will take the London Chamber Orchestra to the Enescu Festival in Bucharest in an eclectic programme featuring the Music of Enescu, Benjamin, Mozart and Fitkin. He will also make his debut with the Tampere Philharmonic performing works by Sibelius, Stravinsky and Bartok. Last season he returned to Orchestre National de Belgique, Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and Beethoven Orchester Bonn and he made debuts with the Nashville Symphony and Rochester Philharmonic orchestras. 

Previous seasons have seen Warren-Green at the helm of the Philharmonia, London Philharmonic, Royal Liverpool Philharmonic and Royal Scottish National orchestras, and the NHK, Singapore, Sapporo and KBS symphony orchestras. Other collaborations include a tour of Japan with the Yomiuri Nippon Symphony Orchestra, and concerts with Zürcher Kammerorchester, RTÉ Symphony Orchestra and Iceland Symphony Orchestra.  

Warren-Green plays a key role in LCO Music Junction. This ground-breaking project, which reached over 3,000 young people in the South of England last season, brings together children in the UK from different backgrounds through a series of interactive workshops. 

Over the last 30 years Christopher Warren-Green has been personally invited to conduct for the Royal Family on many occasions. He led the London Chamber Orchestra during the marriage ceremony of TRH The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge at Westminster Abbey in 2011, which was broadcast to a global audience of two billion and with the Philharmonia Orchestra he conducted HM The Queen’s 90th birthday concert at Theatre Royal, Drury Lane. 

Warren-Green is a fellow of the Royal Academy of Music and has recorded extensively for Sony, Phillips, Virgin EMI, Chandos, Decca and Deutsche Grammophon. He also records with the London Chamber Orchestra for Signum Classics.

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Audio

Contacts

Jane Brown +44 (0)20 3725 9129
Janet Marsden +44 (0)20 3725 9140

Reviews

“The maestro certainly sparked a fleet, zesty performance from the orchestra, especially the trumpets and the trombones, who brought gilded fire to the heraldic episodes.” (BroadwayWorld, December 2017)

“What a concert! The British maestro inspired the Tampere Philharmonic into a warm glow and wonderful solos […] under the baton of Christopher Warren-Green ”En saga” by Sibelius grew into a magical story. The hall was filled with a warm, colourful and wonderfully sparkling sound, which exactly corresponded with the mystical and even tempestuous story of ”En saga”. I can’t remember the last time I heard such a lively and dramatic ”En saga”. Warren-Green allowed the few big climaxes of the work erupt thunderously, and at the same time he tended the continuity in the more understated sections.” ***** (Harri Hautala, Tampere Aamulehti, November 2017)

“[The Dvorak]… had a lot of edge, a lot of energy and sweep. The slow movement was spellbinding, giving way to a driving scherzo and a blazing finale. It was a memorable performance.” (Providence Journal, January 2016)

“The maestro certainly sparked a fleet, zesty performance from the orchestra, especially the trumpets and the trombones, who brought gilded fire to the heraldic episodes.” (BroadwayWorld, December 2017)

“What a concert! The British maestro inspired the Tampere Philharmonic into a warm glow and wonderful solos […] under the baton of Christopher Warren-Green ”En saga” by Sibelius grew into a magical story. The hall was filled with a warm, colourful and wonderfully sparkling sound, which exactly corresponded with the mystical and even tempestuous story of ”En saga”. I can’t remember the last time I heard such a lively and dramatic ”En saga”. Warren-Green allowed the few big climaxes of the work erupt thunderously, and at the same time he tended the continuity in the more understated sections.” ***** (Harri Hautala, Tampere Aamulehti, November 2017)

“[The Dvorak]… had a lot of edge, a lot of energy and sweep. The slow movement was spellbinding, giving way to a driving scherzo and a blazing finale. It was a memorable performance.” (Providence Journal, January 2016)

“From the first slow notes [of Mahler’s Fifth Symphony] … Warren-Green had the confidence to build gradually, trusting us to stay with him. The warm, weighty opening came to full speed slowly, like a locomotive picking up steam as it climbed a long grade. The second movement burst forward like an undammed brook; the musicians played with such fervor they had to retune when it ended.” (Charlotte Observer, November 2015)

“As for Dvorak's Ninth (or "New World") Symphony, conductor Christopher Warren-Green and the orchestra summoned up all of the appropriate drama on the work's opening movement, sections and soloists stepping forward for consistently impressive turns.” (Rob Hubbard, Pioneer Press, February 2015)

“Warren-Green conducted the first of the Houston Symphony’s annual ‘Messiah’ performances with relish…I’ve rarely heard the story of Jesus’ advent, suffering and victory told so vividly.” (Steven Brown, Houston Chronicle, December 2014)

“…I found Friday's performance to be the strongest 'Messiah' the Minnesota Orchestra has offered in several years. Under the entertainingly expressive, old-school direction of Christopher Warren-Green, the orchestra sounded more like a first-rate baroque ensemble than at any time in recent memory…thanks in part to the varied dynamics deftly sculpted by conductor Warren-Green, the orchestra's musicians also summoned up all of the beauty within Handel's magnificent melodies…this will be a tough 'Messiah' to top.” (Rob Hubbard, Pioneer Press, December 2014)

“It was an interpretation in which emotion flowed, yet was efficiently channeled into a precise and propulsive conduit. The ensemble was admirably balanced, both in sound and spirit, bringing the concert to a wonderfully stirring conclusion.” (Rob Hubbard, Pioneer Press, June 2014)

“Christopher Warren-Green’s understanding of the music, relaxed yet at the same time exciting, was heard in every bar…He suspended the music between restlessness and elegance, as well as bringing out the dramatic impulses… Mr Warren-Green created a true piece of magic.” (General-Anzeiger, November 2013)

“He has tremendous presence, a leonine head of thick gray hair and a fine, clear conducting style that matches his interpretive abilities…Warren-Green brought a sure hand to shaping the symphony, bringing out all the inherent power of this music, and bringing it to a thrilling conclusion. Warren-Green will be back next season: excellent news.”  (St. Louis Today, January 2012)

“Warren-Green conjured up poetry and theatrics in other spots. When the music needed warmth from the strings rather than massiveness, he helped them savour the sleekness and glow of the tunes. The “Festival at Baghdad” was bustling and flashy. When it came time to wreck Sinbad's ship, Warren-Green whipped up crashing waves of sound.” (The Charlotte Observer, January 2009)

“[Christopher Warren-Green led]… the Charlotte Symphony Orchestra with breadth and panache through Rimsky-Korsakov's opulent Scheherazade and Mussorgsky's gaudy “Night on Bald Mountain” (in Rimsky's orchestration).” (The Charlotte Observer, January 2009)

“Wednesday evening's first offering of the '08 "Messiah" at Minneapolis' Basilica of St. Mary was an interpretation of great delicacy, one at its most compelling when letting the sadness emerge. Under the direction of English conductor Christopher Warren-Green, it was a performance as graceful and smooth as his confident conducting… Wednesday's audience was well served by his emphasis upon precision from the strings, power from the choir and openhearted emotion from the vocal soloists.” (Pioneer Press, December 2008)

“…the sensitive, light accompaniment [was] provided by the London Chamber Orchestra under the baton of Christopher Warren-Green” (The Times, November 2008)

“In the essential ingredients of this music, with its lilt, sway, heartstopping teasing of musical timing and effortless ebb and flow, Warren-Green was matchless… Everything was the same; the music, the programming, Warren-Green’s inexhaustible vocabulary of techniques and style, and the general delivery; and his timing in this fiendishly tricky music is light years ahead of the efforts of many conductors” (The Herald, January 2008)