Spira mirabilis
Ensemble

“Spira mirabilis represent a transformative vision of what a symphony orchestra can be…They are a revelation…” (Tom Service, The Guardian)

Contacts

Jasper Parrott +44 (0)20 7229 9166
Yasemin Kandemiroğlu +44 (0)20 3725 9174

Biography

In the remote northern-Italian town of Formigine brews the musical revolution that is Spira mirabilis – a group of elite young professional musicians from around the world, active in many of the best European orchestras.

Spira mirabilis’ main aim is to learn from each other, studying and researching as a musical laboratory where professional musicians can share their knowledge. Working without a conductor and in the spirit of an enlarged chamber group, they immerse themselves in the score with the aim of reaching an interpretative consensus on a shared vision, and a complete synthesis with the work. Spira’s concerts offer audiences an in-depth experience of a single work and the opportunity to rediscover hitherto familiar music performed with the ensemble’s singular style and vibrancy. They encourage audiences to become an active part of the concert experience, returning to the stage following their performance and entering into a lively engagement with a ‘Question and Answer’ session.

In the remote northern-Italian town of Formigine brews the musical revolution that is Spira mirabilis – a group of elite young professional musicians from around the world, active in many of the best European orchestras.

Spira mirabilis’ main aim is to learn from each other, studying and researching as a musical laboratory where professional musicians can share their knowledge. Working without a conductor and in the spirit of an enlarged chamber group, they immerse themselves in the score with the aim of reaching an interpretative consensus on a shared vision, and a complete synthesis with the work. Spira’s concerts offer audiences an in-depth experience of a single work and the opportunity to rediscover hitherto familiar music performed with the ensemble’s singular style and vibrancy. They encourage audiences to become an active part of the concert experience, returning to the stage following their performance and entering into a lively engagement with a ‘Question and Answer’ session. 

In 2014/15, Spira returned to Aldeburgh with two difficult and challenging concerts which brought huge success: one featuring Britten’s Nocturne with tenor and small orchestra, the other was the world premiere of a new piece called Spiralling dedicated to them by the distinguished composer Colin Matthews. In the same season Spira’s mega project was Beethoven’s Symphony No.9, which they performed, unconducted, with a local choir from Modena and gave three sold-out performances in Formigine, Modena and Lucca. 2015/16 saw Spira mirabilis perform Schumann’s Symphony No.3, Mozart’s Così fan tutte in concert with singers and a critically acclaimed tour of Mendelssohn’s Midsummer Nights Dream in a semi-staged set up with Italian actors, including a performance at Arte Sella in the Dolomites forest. 

Future plans include; a revival of Beethoven’s Symphony No.7 at the Southbank Centre and on a UK tour, a tour of Mozart’s Nozze di Figaro (full opera with singers & unconducted) and a new focus on Brahms’ symphonies.

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Contacts

Jasper Parrott +44 (0)20 7229 9166
Yasemin Kandemiroğlu +44 (0)20 3725 9174

Reviews

“The brilliant Spira Mirabilis orchestra marked the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death in a dazzlingly eccentric fashion. ... This was the most joyous celebration of the Bard I’ve seen all year.” (The Times, Richard Morrison, July 2016)

“During the final movement of the Sixth, when the shepherd's song disappears, leaving just a trace of itself in the lilting pizzicato, I realised that what holds this ensemble together isn't eye contact or collective breathing, isn't even the placing of an up-beat from this or that player. It's joy.” (The Independent on Sunday, June 2012)

“Their performance of the Pastoral Symphony was one of the most glorious Beethoven interpretations I have ever heard…. words don’t encompass the magic velvet shimmer of the murmuring lower strings in the second movement, nor the rumbustious peasant swing in the third, nor the thunderous thwack of the Storm, nor the vivid character of the wind solos.”  (The Times, May 2012)

“The brilliant Spira Mirabilis orchestra marked the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death in a dazzlingly eccentric fashion. ... This was the most joyous celebration of the Bard I’ve seen all year.” (The Times, Richard Morrison, July 2016)

“During the final movement of the Sixth, when the shepherd's song disappears, leaving just a trace of itself in the lilting pizzicato, I realised that what holds this ensemble together isn't eye contact or collective breathing, isn't even the placing of an up-beat from this or that player. It's joy.” (The Independent on Sunday, June 2012)

“Their performance of the Pastoral Symphony was one of the most glorious Beethoven interpretations I have ever heard…. words don’t encompass the magic velvet shimmer of the murmuring lower strings in the second movement, nor the rumbustious peasant swing in the third, nor the thunderous thwack of the Storm, nor the vivid character of the wind solos.”  (The Times, May 2012)

“an exhilarating performance of Beethoven’s Fourth Symphony by Spira Mirabilis…Such rapport, flexibility, vivacity and virtuosity! It showed what’s possible in a musical world where idealism and flair have yet to be diluted by compromise and routine.” (The Times, June 2011)

“I have seen the future of orchestral music. And boy, is it good…. Hearing them play Beethoven was like seeing an image through a telescope come magically into focus. Their example should be followed everywhere.”  (The Guardian, June 2011)

“The London debut of Spira mirabilis was uniquely thrilling. Had you closed your eyes, theirs was a period-inflected, super-caffeinated Eroica of the sort Giovanni Antonini might conduct. Eyes open, it was a live-action analysis of Beethoven's score, leadership passing from first violinist Lorenza Borrani to cellist Luise Buchberger, flautist Anne Parisot and viola player Simone Jandl as each idea was introduced and developed, with outstanding warmth and delicacy in the supporting textures. Played with such joy and daring, this was an Eroica to make any purist blink.” (The Independent, November 2010)

“It was thrilling to hear top players from orchestras throughout Europe freed to take responsibility and to create music from the inside. The funeral March movement was as moving, in its austere heart and its moments of ravishing beauty, as I have ever heard it. And the pinpoint precision of the strings in the Scherzo caught the breath. The audience leapt to its feet in a spontaneous ovation.” (The Guardian, November 2010)

“This facination directly moves the audience and makes Spira the exemplary pioneer of a modern mediation of classical music to a new generation.” (Welt am Sonntag, October 2010)

“The whole orchestra turns to a natural, resonant body which breathes, moves and shows much soul and heart. It definitively leaves nobody cold... It lasted just half an hour. But what the small orchestra took out of the score, provided hapiness for the ears for days.” (Hamburger Abendblatt, October 2010)

“Never before has one heard Brahms played with such a crisp freshness” (Weser-Kurier, September 2010)

Discography

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