Martin Fröst
Clarinet

“Until you’ve heard Martin Fröst, you really haven’t heard the clarinet.” (The Times)

Contacts

Jasper Parrott +44 (0)20 7229 9166
Charlotte Miles +44 (0)20 3725 9121
Charlotte Marino +44 (0)20 3725 9179

Biography

Artistic Partner: The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra
Artistic Director: Stavanger Chamber Music Festival
Artistic Director: Vinterfest

 

 

In 2016/17, Fröst will make his debuts with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra (Osmo Vänskä) and New Zealand Symphony Orchestra (Edo de Waart). He also returns to the Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart Festival (Paavo Järvi), NHK Symphony Orchestra (David Zinman) and the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, with whom he will also tour Europe. Future tour partners include the BBC Symphony Orchestra and further ahead, he also appears with Gothenburg Symphony, Shanghai Symphony and the Orchestre symphonique de Montréal.

Artistic Partner: The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra
Artistic Director: Stavanger Chamber Music Festival
Artistic Director: Vinterfest

 

 

In 2016/17, Fröst will make his debuts with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra (Osmo Vänskä) and New Zealand Symphony Orchestra (Edo de Waart). He also returns to the Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart Festival (Paavo Järvi), NHK Symphony Orchestra (David Zinman) and the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, with whom he will also tour Europe. Future tour partners include the BBC Symphony Orchestra and further ahead, he also appears with Gothenburg Symphony, Shanghai Symphony and the Orchestre symphonique de Montréal.

Last season Fröst embarked on a multi-year project entitled ‘Genesis’ which explores the source and development of music inspired by dance and folk, rite and praise. The first stage of the project ‘Roots’ was released worldwide by Sony Classical in December 2015. This first recording for the label received huge critical acclaim and in August 2016 it was announced that Fröst would receive the Instrumentalist of the Year Award: Clarinet from ECHO Klassik for it. This season he will take ‘Roots’ on tour giving performances with the Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra, and throughout Europe with the Amsterdam Sinfonietta in Rome, London and Amsterdam.

This season also sees the launch of ‘Exodus’ - the next phase of the Genesis project. The programme focuses on musicians in exile including works by Ligeti, Verdi, Golijov and a new work by Borisova-Ollas. Fröst will perform the program as part of his artistic partnerships with both the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra and Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra.

As a chamber musician, Fröst regularly performs with leading international artists including Sol Gabetta, Janine Jansen, Yuja Wang, Leif Ove Andsnes, Roland Pöntinen, Maxim Rysanov and Antoine Tamestit. 

Download Bio
uk

Video

 
 

Audio

Contacts

Jasper Parrott +44 (0)20 7229 9166
Charlotte Miles +44 (0)20 3725 9121
Charlotte Marino +44 (0)20 3725 9179

Reviews

“If the Copland displayed Fröst's virtuosic skills in a jazz-inflected context, then the Bartók and traditional Klezmer Dances turned up the heat to boiling point as a dazzling array of sounds and extended techniques were hurled across the auditorium. … a truly joyous evening of music-making.” (Bachtrack, February 2017)

“The program featured the charismatic Swedish clarinettist Martin Frost in a fleet, brilliant account of Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto. […] he instinctively moved with choreographic grace that complemented his expressive playing. As an encore he electrified the audience with a dazzling, wailing performance of a klezmer dance by his brother, Goran Frost.” (New York Times, August 2016)

“ 'Roots' is already his second large-format special program … At the live premiere in the Art Nouveau-Stockholm Concert Hall, where the Nobel Prizes are awarded, the sold out hall was raving. (And they were there)  to experience this tall blonde clarinet soloist as an entertainer who was intelligent,  clever, charming and also very, very good on his instrument.” (Manuel Brug, Die Welt, February 2016)

“If the Copland displayed Fröst's virtuosic skills in a jazz-inflected context, then the Bartók and traditional Klezmer Dances turned up the heat to boiling point as a dazzling array of sounds and extended techniques were hurled across the auditorium. … a truly joyous evening of music-making.” (Bachtrack, February 2017)

“The program featured the charismatic Swedish clarinettist Martin Frost in a fleet, brilliant account of Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto. […] he instinctively moved with choreographic grace that complemented his expressive playing. As an encore he electrified the audience with a dazzling, wailing performance of a klezmer dance by his brother, Goran Frost.” (New York Times, August 2016)

“ 'Roots' is already his second large-format special program … At the live premiere in the Art Nouveau-Stockholm Concert Hall, where the Nobel Prizes are awarded, the sold out hall was raving. (And they were there)  to experience this tall blonde clarinet soloist as an entertainer who was intelligent,  clever, charming and also very, very good on his instrument.” (Manuel Brug, Die Welt, February 2016)

"His concept album "Roots" (allegedly part of a larger "Genesis" project) connects Telemann to Hildegard von Bingen and goes directly to Göran Fröst (brother of the soloist). From Bartók it goes seamlessly into the Spaniard de Falla and from there to a Swedish folk …  In short, courageous, curious and beautiful. And courage should - especially in this day and age, in the specialized classical landscape - be rewarded!" (Kai Luerhrs Kaiser, Kulturradio, February 2016)

“He boldly and effortlessly breaks through both genre and temporal boundaries with fun ... The compilation is like a house in which one strolls from room to room, looking at different facets and marvelling. The architect of this house has hereby created a true work of art. It resounds with Martin Fröst's usual clarinet brilliance.” (Crescendo, February 2016)

“The Swedish clarinettist Martin Fröst is always on the look out, always alert. On his new album "Roots", he travels from the earliest classical roots to contemporary music … With Fröst it works perfectly - and live even better - because he is roaringly good on his instrument. Each piece drips with quality from a Klezmer arrangement by his brother Göran,  folk dances by Bartok to a traditional Swedish folksong. While playing Fröst conducts the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra. His tone curls smoothly to the musical core of each of the pieces.” (Trouw, January 2016)

“This all served to highlight the marvel that is Mozart’s clarinet concerto, which the outstanding Martin Fröst played with irresistible character on a modern version of the basset clarinet for which Mozart wrote. Fröst’s legato in the adagio was particularly fine, while the wit and dexterity of his phrasing in the rondo made it feel as if Papageno was somehow on the platform. Interplay between soloist and a much reduced orchestra was exceptional. Here, finally, were hidden, and not so hidden, depths.” (The Guardian, October 2015)

“Musicians queue up to work with clarinettist Martin Fröst, even if it could be pointed out that it does them few favours: his extraordinarily pure tone, sinuous phrasing and seamless breathing technique tend to throw any tiny inaccuracies elsewhere on the podium into a relief they wouldn’t otherwise have had. Still, they seem happy to risk it – and audiences aren’t complaining.” (Erica Jeal, The Guardian, May 2015)

“Frost came into the Beethoven symphony with some strong interpretive ideas, judging from the well-executed shifts in dynamics and tempos. It felt like some chemistry was being established, so here's hoping that Frost and the SPCO will renew their acquaintance soon.” (Pioneer Press, October 2014)

“the Swedish clarinetist had such a sweet, smooth caramel tone and full sound across the ample range of his extended "A" clarinet that this became an exceptional interpretation, complemented splendidly by the SPCO's expertise with Mozart.” (Pioneer Press, October 2014)

“With such dramatic flair and exquisite dynamic control from Fröst, I doubt I’ll hear the clarinet part played this well for some time. If autumn yields other such riches at Wigmore Hall, it’ll be an abundant harvest indeed.” (bachtrack.com, September 2014) 

“There are plenty of virtuosic fireworks in Poulenc’s Clarinet Sonata, which showed off Mr. Fröst’s impeccable technique. But the most astonishing moments were some of the quiet ones, including a pianissimo line in the Romanza that was so subtle and so private as to evoke a sound half remembered.” (The New York Times, August 2014)

“In earlier times, the talent of Martin Frost would have attracted suspicion. Like that of Paganini, whom contemporaries suspected to be in cahoots with the Devil… There is nothing demonic about Mr. Frost, the 43-year-old Swedish clarinetist who performed in two concerts at the Mostly Mozart Festival on Monday evening. Lanky, with a mop of flaxen hair, he affects an air of amused detachment when he isn’t playing. And yet there is something approaching the supernatural about his command of his instrument.” (The New York Times, August 2014)

"Mr. Fröst’s reading of the Mozart concerto was a paragon of lyricism: breathtaking in its pianissimos, utterly fluid in its legatos, gleaming in its ornamental flourishes…. The spectacular encore… began as a modest improvisation on licks from Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring and opened into two riotous outbursts of klezmerlike note-spinning, ranging mercurially from the most delicate and attenuated to the most raucous, with the orchestra jamming alongside. Between the two performances Mr. Fröst exhibited a virtuosity and a musicianship unsurpassed by any clarinetist — perhaps any instrumentalist — in my memory." (James R. Oestreich, The New York Times, December 2013)

"The soloist is the internationally acclaimed Martin Fröst, who, out of this greatest of all clarinet concertos, creates something that gets deep under the skin. Seamlessly and with a velvety tone, he strides through the huge range of his instrument, and on the borders of silence, there are windows to the soul opening up. In the unpretentious sensuality of the Adagio, the music speaks with even more intensity when sounding so perfectly natural. ….stupendous, virtuosic, and exhilarating – more Fröst please!" (Peter Korfmacher, Leipziger Volkszeitung, November 2013)

“He remains one of this masterpiece’s supreme interpreters...His tempi remain remarkably constant, but he brings a more introverted, spiritual dimension here, and relishes the opera buffa wit of the Rondo finale.”  (Hugh Canning, The Sunday Times, October 2013)

“It’s some of the best controlled pianissimos that I’ve heard on the clarinet for quite a while. The most beautiful, even sound and taking such care with the gradations of dynamics and ends of the phrases… what more could you want?” (Andrew MacGregor, BBC Radio 3, October 2013)

"The Swedish clarinetist brought astounding technical assurance and a rock-star-like swagger to this demanding music  [Nielsen's Clarinet Concerto]. Fröst blazed through the difficulties, with a robust tone and personality-plus character in the cadenzas, throwing off the virtuosic passages, rapid trilling, and myriad challenges with liquid agility and seemingly effortless ease.' (Lawrence A. Johnson, The Chicago Classical Review, June 2013)

"The spotlight that night was on woodwind....Fröst was consistently mesmerising in Mozart's Clarinet Quintet, his tone silky and seamless, every note meaningful." (Erica Jeal, The Guardian, May 2013)