Ksenija Sidorova
Accordion

“Sidorova is eager to blow your mind with the vast and dazzling possibilities of her instrument that go leagues beyond the stereotypes” (ZEALnyc, August 2017)

Contacts

Tuğçe Tez +44 (0)20 3725 9148
Alice O'Reilly +44 (0)20 3725 9103

Biography

Praised as “superbly subtle and virtuosic” (The Arts Desk) and “an amazingly accomplished artist” (Classical Source), Ksenija Sidorova is the leading ambassador for the accordion. 

Ksenija’s 2017/18 season includes performances with MDR Sinfonieorchester Leipzig (Kristjan Järvi), NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchester (Thomas Hengelbrock), Atlanta Symphony (Miguel Harth-Bedoya), Orchestre Philharmonique de Monte-Carlo (Mikhail Geerts), Orchestre Philharmonique du Luxembourg (Paavo Järvi), Stuttgarter Philharmoniker (Jan Willem de Vriend), NFM Wrocław Philharmonic (Daniel Raiskin), Bilkent Symphony Orchestra (Manuel López Gómez) and with the Tonkünstler-Orchester Niederösterreich at the Grafenegg Music Festival.    

Praised as “superbly subtle and virtuosic” (The Arts Desk) and “an amazingly accomplished artist” (Classical Source), Ksenija Sidorova is the leading ambassador for the accordion. 

Ksenija’s 2017/18 season includes performances with MDR Sinfonieorchester Leipzig (Kristjan Järvi), NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchester (Thomas Hengelbrock), Atlanta Symphony (Miguel Harth-Bedoya), Orchestre Philharmonique de Monte-Carlo (Mikhail Geerts), Orchestre Philharmonique du Luxembourg (Paavo Järvi), Stuttgarter Philharmoniker (Jan Willem de Vriend), NFM Wrocław Philharmonic (Daniel Raiskin), Bilkent Symphony Orchestra (Manuel López Gómez) and with the Tonkünstler-Orchester Niederösterreich at the Grafenegg Music Festival.    

Following a successful debut recital at Mostly Mozart Festival in New York’s Lincoln Centre, she continues her recital tour in MITO and Macerata Festivals, Baden-Baden, Lucerne, Paris, Salzburg and Birmingham. She is one of the featured artists for the Junge Wilde series and has performed at Cheltenham, Verbier, Bad Kissingen and Rheingau festivals. 

Ksenija continues her ongoing collaboration with Avi Avital across Germany and Italy. She regularly collaborates with Miloš Karadaglić, Juan Diego Flórez, Nicola Benedetti, Thomas Gould, Andreas Ottensamer and Joseph Calleja. Her first album, Carmen, was released on Deutsche Grammophon in summer 2016. 

Encouraged to take up the instrument by a grandmother steeped in the folk tradition of accordion playing, Ksenija started to play the instrument aged six under the guidance of Marija Gasele in her hometown of Riga. Her quest for more exposure to both classical and contemporary repertoire took her to London where she became a prize-winning undergraduate at the Royal Academy of Music studying under Owen Murray.  

Download Bio
uk

Video

 
 

Contacts

Tuğçe Tez +44 (0)20 3725 9148
Alice O'Reilly +44 (0)20 3725 9103

Reviews

Latvian virtuoso Ksenija Sidorova appeared in “A Little Night Music,” the Mostly Mozart Festival’s late-night concert series, and her performances were revelatory. They displayed not only her abundant musicianship and that of the masters whose music she presented, but also the continued development of the instrument itself, which now enables the player’s left hand to roam far and free beyond an oom-pah bass. The repertory consisted mostly of catchy miniatures, but if you want real substance, try this transcription of the opening movement of Bach’s French Overture in B minor, and watch it catch fire in the fugal section. (New York Times, James R. Oestreich, August 2017 - Mostly Mozart Festival)  

“Sidorova played with verve, style, and attitude, as well as impeccable virtuosity and an amazing dynamic range. Her music-making included a considerable amount of showmanship, as if she were creating performance art, not just playing an instrument. In the panoramic, multi-movement Autumnal Sceneries by Anatoly Kusyakov, Sidorova continued to display the startling timbral potential of her instrument: amazing richness and fullness of sound, with an unexpected array of colors. It was a dazzling cap to one of the most purely enjoyable musical events of the season.” (ZEALnyc, Joshua Rosenblum, August 2017 - Mostly Mozart Little Night recital)

The final piece of this excellent festive jigsaw comes in the slight form of virtuoso Latvian accordion player Ksenija Sidorova, whose wonderful dexterity, tone and sheer sense of fun makes the instrument something of a revelation. (Liverpool Echo, Catherine Jones, December 2017) 

Latvian virtuoso Ksenija Sidorova appeared in “A Little Night Music,” the Mostly Mozart Festival’s late-night concert series, and her performances were revelatory. They displayed not only her abundant musicianship and that of the masters whose music she presented, but also the continued development of the instrument itself, which now enables the player’s left hand to roam far and free beyond an oom-pah bass. The repertory consisted mostly of catchy miniatures, but if you want real substance, try this transcription of the opening movement of Bach’s French Overture in B minor, and watch it catch fire in the fugal section. (New York Times, James R. Oestreich, August 2017 - Mostly Mozart Festival)  

“Sidorova played with verve, style, and attitude, as well as impeccable virtuosity and an amazing dynamic range. Her music-making included a considerable amount of showmanship, as if she were creating performance art, not just playing an instrument. In the panoramic, multi-movement Autumnal Sceneries by Anatoly Kusyakov, Sidorova continued to display the startling timbral potential of her instrument: amazing richness and fullness of sound, with an unexpected array of colors. It was a dazzling cap to one of the most purely enjoyable musical events of the season.” (ZEALnyc, Joshua Rosenblum, August 2017 - Mostly Mozart Little Night recital)

The final piece of this excellent festive jigsaw comes in the slight form of virtuoso Latvian accordion player Ksenija Sidorova, whose wonderful dexterity, tone and sheer sense of fun makes the instrument something of a revelation. (Liverpool Echo, Catherine Jones, December 2017) 

“The boldness of Sidorova's concept, the thoroughness with which she and her colleagues deconstructed the original and the flights of improvisation that peppered the performance made this a singular experience. ... It was the musicianship of her playing that left the deepest impression during her Ravinia debut. ... The way Sidorova shaped her phrases, toyed with her tempos and shaded her tone colors made even the most understated gestures satisfying to hear. ... In all, a tour de force of imagination, instrumentation and improvisation.” [Carmen recording] (Howard Reich, Chicago Tribune, August 2016)

“..Benedetti is joined by star accordionist Ksenija Sidorova in a show-stopping performance which will have you on your feet! The warm acoustic of the Decca recording comes in appropriate widescreen sound.” (Gramophone Magazine)

“...  the glorious Latvian accordion player Ksenija Sidorova and the versatile Thomas Gould, whose violin playing reaches the parts few others do, gave a short recital at the intimate 1901 Arts Club, near London's Waterloo station. Works ranging from Bach to Schnittke demonstrated the exotic colours of both instruments, which sounded at their Gypsy-like best in Bartók's Romanian folk dances and Monti's Csárdás. Piazzolla's Café 1930, from Histoire du Tango, had a luxuriant, sexy melancholy. Gould and Sidorova, sparks flying, introduced each piece. The audience chuckled and cheered in response. This is the second time this year I have raved about a squeezebox player after a lifetime's silence on the entire topic. Something is stirring in the bellows-driven, free-reed aerophone undergrowth. Simplest formats are the most revealing, starting with Orpheus and his lyre. These two young musicians showed what they can do, and what can be done, with their instruments. In so doing, they repurified our cluttered world of ordered sound.” (Fiona Maddocks, The Observer)

“The silver lining was Ksenija Sidorova [...], for she has the ability to steal a musical heart.” (The Telegraph)

“Before you say a word, Latvia's Ksenija Sidorova takes them out of your mouth: "It will be a while before the phrase 'I play the classical accordion' doesn't sound unusual or funny." Her determination to extend the instrument's reputation from its folk roots is formidable. She studied at London's Royal Academy of Music and has won numerous prizes. You can see why. Technique and phrasing in Mozart's 12 Variations on "Ah, vous dirais-je, Maman" are subtle and witty. Her chosen repertoire embraces Nordheim, Bach, Berio, Scarlatti, Schnittke, Takahashi and (with the Sacconi Quartet) some smokily beguiling Piazzolla, all played with light, shade, delicacy – and breathtaking virtuosity.” (Fiona Maddocks, The Observer)

“Scarlatti and Mozart are played with delicacy and grace. Modern accordion classics by Arne Nordheim and Berio get atmospheric outings: Berio’s Sequenza XIII emerges as a masterpiece of suppressed emotion. Schnittke’s sardonic reworkings of Mozart and Tchaikovsky are superbly delivered.” (The Times)

“The accordion’s sound world is characterful but somewhat constrained. It needs a virtuoso such as the young Latvian Sidorova to show just how flexible the instrument can be...In transcriptions of Bach, Scarlatti and Mozart, Sidorova is simply brilliant and staggeringly precise.” (The Sunday Times)

“Sidorova here demonstrates the remarkable potential of the accordion, not an instrument generally appreciated in classical circles...[The Bach] is fascinating, with Sidorova making the accordion sound like a miniature organ...An attractive and unusual disc.” (Awards Issue, Gramophone Magazine) 

“Anybody disinclined to take the accordion seriously as a classical instrument should listen to the opening track here...[the Nordheim and Berio] are advertisements for the accordion's expressive potential, mining its virtuosic possibilities...a debut recording full of panache and communicative musicianship.” (BBC Music Magazine)

Discography