Krystian Zimerman
Piano

“Technical perfection was only the starting point for a performance of astonishing energy and sometime ferocious intensity.” (The Guardian, July 2015)

Contacts

Jasper Parrott +44 (0)20 7229 9166
Tracy Lees +44 (0)20 3725 9119

Biography

Krystian Zimerman won the prestigious Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw at the age of 18 and was catapulted to the forefront of the international circuit. He has worked with many great musicians including Artur Rubinstein, Leonard Bernstein, and Herbert von Karajan, all of whom who were very influential in his career. Zimerman has a very meticulous attitude to recording and many of his discs have won major prizes, including the Gramophone Award, the Grand Prix du Disque and the Diapason D'Or.

These days Zimerman prefers to concentrate on solo recitals, bringing his own specially prepared piano and keyboards personally to every concert although he has recently returned to concerto performances in his unique collaboration with Sir Simon Rattle.

Krystian Zimerman won the prestigious Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw at the age of 18 and was catapulted to the forefront of the international circuit. He has worked with many great musicians including Artur Rubinstein, Leonard Bernstein, and Herbert von Karajan, all of whom who were very influential in his career. Zimerman has a very meticulous attitude to recording and many of his discs have won major prizes, including the Gramophone Award, the Grand Prix du Disque and the Diapason D'Or.

These days Zimerman prefers to concentrate on solo recitals, bringing his own specially prepared piano and keyboards personally to every concert although he has recently returned to concerto performances in his unique collaboration with Sir Simon Rattle.

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Contacts

Jasper Parrott +44 (0)20 7229 9166
Tracy Lees +44 (0)20 3725 9119

Reviews

“Any performance by Zimerman is a special occasion, and these occasions have become even more precious over recent years as his appearances in the UK seem to grow less frequent. But as this unforgettable account of Brahms’s Piano Concerto No 1 in D minor showed, he and Rattle have forged a very special musical partnership.  The greatest interpreters make you believe you are encountering even the most familiar work for the first time, and Zimerman offered exactly that kind of journey of discovery through the vast span of the Brahms concerto. But this was not just a reading of the score in which every detail was deeply considered and immaculately presented. That technical perfection was only the starting point for a performance of astonishing energy and sometime ferocious intensity.” (The Guardian, July 2015)

“His playing had great power, but also an aristocratic poise to the balancing of chords, a clarity in inner parts. Zimerman does not attack the concerto … Here was rather a shaft of light against the vast panorama of Rattle’s dark-hued sky.” (Financial Times, July 2015) 

“Any performance by Zimerman is a special occasion, and these occasions have become even more precious over recent years as his appearances in the UK seem to grow less frequent. But as this unforgettable account of Brahms’s Piano Concerto No 1 in D minor showed, he and Rattle have forged a very special musical partnership.  The greatest interpreters make you believe you are encountering even the most familiar work for the first time, and Zimerman offered exactly that kind of journey of discovery through the vast span of the Brahms concerto. But this was not just a reading of the score in which every detail was deeply considered and immaculately presented. That technical perfection was only the starting point for a performance of astonishing energy and sometime ferocious intensity.” (The Guardian, July 2015)

“His playing had great power, but also an aristocratic poise to the balancing of chords, a clarity in inner parts. Zimerman does not attack the concerto … Here was rather a shaft of light against the vast panorama of Rattle’s dark-hued sky.” (Financial Times, July 2015) 

“Everything about the performance of Brahms’s Piano Concerto No 1 in D minor, which took up the evening’s first half, was freshly arresting, yet always in a way that served the composer. Although Rattle urged the orchestra on in a start that was full of tension, he also coaxed playing of uncommonly soft, dreamy reflection. Zimerman responded with crisp pianism of almost Classical restraint, but had the massive heft for which this work frequently calls.” (The Telegraph, July 2015) 

“Partnered with exemplary polish and unstinting dedication by Rattle and the Berliners, Zimerman is at his patrician, dazzlingly articulate best, locating even greater reserves of concentration and rapt hush than previously in the slow movement (where his sublime touch and gorgeous cantabile tone remain things of wonder), while the thrusting momentum and thrilling sense of purpose he and Rattle bring to the chaconne finale make for a giddy culmination.” (Andrew Aschenbach, Gramophone, September 2015)

“The Philharmonia had bagged the best possible soloist: Krystian Zimerman, the work’s original dedicatee. He’s as fastidiously intense as Lutoslawski himself, and can seem forbiddingly lofty on stage. Here he was all smiles, throwing himself into the music’s spry opening gestures with enormous relish, caressing the Chopin-like arabesques and rounding off each fragmentary phrase in a way that seemed to conjure forth the orchestra’s response.” (The Telegraph, January 2013)

“Those qualities all shone out of the recital’s highlight, the B flat minor sonata. It’s a psychological trainwreck of a piece, hinged around that much-abused Funeral March, but Zimerman built up to that point with stunning poise, striving for simplicity and line over effect and incident. When it came, that march rose out on a thread of sound as if from the grave itself, before pounding into horrifying life. Equally breathtaking was the Op 31 Scherzo in B flat — a miniature drama whose tangled thickets parted at Zimerman’s magic touch.” (The Times, February 2010)