Katarina Dalayman
Soprano

“Few manage to encompass [Kundry’s] sensuality and her wild extremes as comprehensively as Dalayman’s first-class singing did.” (Richard Fairman, Financial Times)

Contacts

Shirley Thomson +44 (0)20 3725 9173
Christopher Lawson +44 (0)20 3725 9108

Biography

With a reputation for strong, dramatic interpretations married with impeccable musicianship, Swedish soprano Katarina Dalayman has sustained a long and prestigious international career in the dramatic repertoire and she has enjoyed enduring collaborations with many of today’s foremost conductors. Dalayman has performed a wide range of roles including Isolde (Tristan und Isolde), Marie (Wozzeck), Lisa (Queen of Spades), Ariadne (Ariadne auf Naxos), Katarina Ismailova (Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk) and the title role of Elektra. With a particularly strong association to Wagner's Brünnhilde, Dalayman has appeared in Ring cycles at The Metropolitan Opera, Opéra National de Paris, Wiener and Bayerische staatsopers, Teatro alla Scala, Deutsche Oper Berlin, Semperoper Dresden, Salzburger Festspiele and Festival d’Aix en Provence. 

With a reputation for strong, dramatic interpretations married with impeccable musicianship, Swedish soprano Katarina Dalayman has sustained a long and prestigious international career in the dramatic repertoire and she has enjoyed enduring collaborations with many of today’s foremost conductors. Dalayman has performed a wide range of roles including Isolde (Tristan und Isolde), Marie (Wozzeck), Lisa (Queen of Spades), Ariadne (Ariadne auf Naxos), Katarina Ismailova (Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk) and the title role of Elektra. With a particularly strong association to Wagner's Brünnhilde, Dalayman has appeared in Ring cycles at The Metropolitan Opera, Opéra National de Paris, Wiener and Bayerische staatsopers, Teatro alla Scala, Deutsche Oper Berlin, Semperoper Dresden, Salzburger Festspiele and Festival d’Aix en Provence. 

Looking ahead to the next phase in her career, Katarina Dalayman’s repertoire is now focused on new roles, having recently made her debut as Kundry (Parsifal) in Dresden, Paris and Stockholm, Judith (Duke Bluebeard’s Castle) in Barcelona and London (Royal Opera House), Ortrud (Lohengrin) with Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, and Brangäne (Tristan und Isolde) at The Metropolitan Opera. She has recently appeared as Herodias (Salome) for Royal Swedish Opera, Foreign Princess (Rusalka) at The Metropolitan Opera, and this season she makes role debuts as Klytämnestra (Elektra), Amneris (Aida), and Kostelnička (Jenůfa), all for Royal Swedish Opera.

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Audio

Contacts

Shirley Thomson +44 (0)20 3725 9173
Christopher Lawson +44 (0)20 3725 9108

Reviews

“Of the protagonists, only one, Katarina Dalayman as Kundry, retains her lustre; her portrayal conjures dramatic presence out of every phrase and can compare with the best of those already available on disc. No one else matches her combination of intensity and vocal security.” (The Guardian, Andrew Clements, May 2017)

“Katarina Dalayman was an unusually sympathetic Fricka, with an easy top” (Bachtrack, May 2017) 

“Already remarkable in Das Rheingold, Katarina Dalayman is a tigress one can’t resist as Fricka. The ease with which the voice has evolved and homogenously developed in the lower registers validates her switch to more mezzo roles.” (Forum Opéra, May 2017) 

“Katarina Dalayman (Fricka) charted every blow in their marital argument. Dalayman, regal and opulent of voice, wheedling and demanding the abandonment of Siegmund” (Bachtrack, My 2017)

“Of the protagonists, only one, Katarina Dalayman as Kundry, retains her lustre; her portrayal conjures dramatic presence out of every phrase and can compare with the best of those already available on disc. No one else matches her combination of intensity and vocal security.” (The Guardian, Andrew Clements, May 2017)

“Katarina Dalayman was an unusually sympathetic Fricka, with an easy top” (Bachtrack, May 2017) 

“Already remarkable in Das Rheingold, Katarina Dalayman is a tigress one can’t resist as Fricka. The ease with which the voice has evolved and homogenously developed in the lower registers validates her switch to more mezzo roles.” (Forum Opéra, May 2017) 

“Katarina Dalayman (Fricka) charted every blow in their marital argument. Dalayman, regal and opulent of voice, wheedling and demanding the abandonment of Siegmund” (Bachtrack, May 2017)

“Katarina Dalayman sang with fiery passion as the Foreign Princess.” (Bachtrack, February 2017)

“The Swedish soprano Katarina Dalayman is subtly conniving as the Foreign Princess.” (Huffington Post, February 2017)

“Katarina Dalayman – that most downwardly mobile of sopranos – brought eloquent warmth to the officially mezzo part of Jocasta.” (Opera Magazine, John Allison, December 2016)

“Katarina Dalayman’s Judith was compellingly characterized” (Opera Magazine, July 2016)

“Katarina Dalayman’s Kundry [is] in powerful voice” (Andrew Clark, Financial Times, October 2013)

“Katarina Dalayman’s Brünnhilde in Stockholm six or seven years ago was sensational and since thens he has also been a masterly Elektra. Her Kundry is on that level” (Göran Forsling, Seen & Heard International, November 2013)

“[The opera] did come alive at times, though – especially when Katarina Dalayman’s exciting Kundry held the stage. Few manage to encompass this character’s sensuality and her wild extremes as comprehensively as Dalayman’s first-class singing did.” (Richard Fairman, Financial Times, August 2013)

“As Kundry, the wild woman who by redeeming Parsifal is herself redeemend, Katarina Dalayman gave an outstanding account of a role perfectly suited to her voice. The Swede’s dusky low notes suggest all the character’s mysteriousness, and higher up she moves effortlessly between voluptuousness and vulnerability.” (John Allison, Telegraph, August 2013) 

“The role fits her voice like a glove and it was a joy and privilege to hear it sung by a soprano, as Wagner stipulates in the score, rather than a mezzo. The high-lying passages held no terrors for the Swedish soprano, nor did its lower reaches where Dalayman produced some wonderfully burnished tones.” (Keith McDonnell, What’s On Stage, August 2013)

“The Brünnhilde of Katarina Dalayman is simply superb, supremely accustomed to the role, she brings a natural dynamic to the role and uses her instrument in dazzling ways.” (Bertrand Bolognesi, Anaclase, July 2013)

“Katarina Dalayman as Brünnhilde displayed strength and sincere intensity in her farewell to her father…[this was] the most compelling scene of the entire production.” (Gabriele Luster, Merkur, July 2013)

“The soprano Katarina Dalayman brings a gleaming voice and sultry phrasing to her performance” (Anthony Tommasini, New York Times, February 2013)

“Dalayman continued to impress [in Götterdämmerung] as Brünnhilde, powerful of voice, but equally attentive to the role’s subtler demands. Her Erwartung-style account of the final scene in the second act was a true wonder to experience” (Mark Berry, Seen & Heard International, June 2011)

“Soprano Katarina Dalayman remains a powerhouse in the huge and taxing role of Brünnhilde.” (Judy Fayard, Wall Street Journal, June 2011)

“Katarina Dalayman had a great success as Brünnhilde [in Siegfried], significantly heightening the tension since [Die Walküre]. Her ample voice is flexible and consistent throughout her range. She communicates the evolution of the character in detail, from young warrior and daughter of Wotan to a mortal woman awoken by Siegfried, and beautifully interpreted “Ewig war ich” with remarkable legato, courage and aplomb right to the last bars.” (Karine Boulanger, Classique Info, March 2011)

“Katarina Dalayman’s powerhouse Brünnhilde has true emotional drive [in Die Walküre]” (Francis Carlin, Financial Times, June 2010)

“Katarina Dalayman’s voice is a powerful beam through the auditorium [in Die Walküre], and full of colour as Brünnhilde.” (Neue Zürcher Zeitung, June 2010)

“Katarina Dalayman has the heft for Maddalena…this is singing on an exalted level.” (Göran Forsling, Seen & Heard International, October 2010)

Discography

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