Francesco Tristano
Piano / Composer

“Francesco Tristano had rhythmic bite and color galore, while bringing engaging impetuosity to the music.” (The New York Times)

Contacts

Moema Parrott +44 (0)78 8466 4051
Chiara Beebe +44 (0)20 3725 9136

Biography

In partnership with Polyarts

Francesco Tristano is an artist of many talents: pianist, composer, techno and jazz musician who combines eras, genres and styles in his music. Almost everything he does illustrates his refusal to accept borders and limits in music, he knows the conventions that have shaped generations of classical pianists – and has chosen to side step them.

Francesco has become a key reference in a new movement which explores the creative intersection between classical and electronic music, homogonising it in a natural way which unites audiences from various worlds in to his own universe.

In partnership with Polyarts

Francesco Tristano is an artist of many talents: pianist, composer, techno and jazz musician who combines eras, genres and styles in his music. Almost everything he does illustrates his refusal to accept borders and limits in music, he knows the conventions that have shaped generations of classical pianists – and has chosen to side step them.

Francesco has become a key reference in a new movement which explores the creative intersection between classical and electronic music, homogonising it in a natural way which unites audiences from various worlds in to his own universe.

Born in 1981, Tristano discovered the piano at the age of five and studied at New York’s Juilliard School for five years. It was in New York that he started to work with electronic and club music as well as completing a master class with Rosalyn Tureck. In 2004, he won the first prize at the International piano competition for contemporary music in Orléans, France. He presented his compositions from an early age and is focusing more and more on this side of his work, after recent successes such as 'A Soft Shell Groove', among others.

Recent and upcoming engagements – both recitals and orchestral - include projects with Kristjan Järvi and MDR Sinfonieorchester Leipzig, La Folle Journee, Sonar, Metz and Evian Festivals, Alter Oper Frankfurt, Orchestre de Lille, Frankfurt Radio Orchestra, Orchestre Philharmonique Luxembourg and recitals in the Sala São Paulo, Teatro Municipal Rio in Brazil and CNDM series in Madrid as well as various tours in Asia.

As a chamber musician, Tristano is very active: he founded his own ensemble, The New Bach Players, which he also conducts. They consciously aim to break with conventions by using a modern grand piano and old, vibratoless boas on contemporary string instruments. He also has a Jazz Trio, KST with fellow musicians Bachar Khalifé and Pascal Schumacher, and often collaborates with important names in different genres such as Derrick May, Carl Craig and Michel Portal to name a few.

To date Tristano has released 12 albums, among them recordings of Bach’s Goldberg Variations and complete keyboard concertos, Luciano Berio’s complete piano works, and Girolamo Frescobaldi’s Toccatas. ‘Not for Piano’ (inFine, 2007), presented his own compositions as well as versions of techno classics at the piano and ‘Idiosynkrasia’ (inFine, 2010), recorded at Carl Craig’s Planet E-communications in Detroit, was released to critical acclaim. As a Deutsche Grammophon artist he released ‘BachCage’, produced by Moritz von Oswald, in 2011, 'The Long Walk' (Buxehetude/ Bach/ Tristano) in 2012 and now, having recently released his third album ‘Scandale’ with Alice Sara Ott in 2014, he is currently working on his fourth solo album to be released in 2016.

Download Bio
uk

Video

 
 

Contacts

Moema Parrott +44 (0)78 8466 4051
Chiara Beebe +44 (0)20 3725 9136

Reviews

“The piece 'Hello' marks the musical field in which Tristano operates. The 34 year old pianist from Luxembourg is a figure of hope who aims to inject his audience, a dwindling species of concertgoers interested in classical music, with fresh blood.” (Frankfurter Rundschau, March 2016)

“Francesco Tristano’s “free” improvised Piano Concerto was a brilliantly received example of how classical music is able to excite audiences today. Standing ovations.” (Leipziger Volkszeitung, March 2016)

“[The programme] ... opened and closed with Ravel – Tristano’s own, very skilful, very witty two-piano version of Boléro, which drives to its climax in a wild torrent of clusters and glissandi, and the composer’s own arrangement of La Valse..” **** (The Guardian, June 2015)

“Tristano's impressively assured survey of Berio's piano music ends with an important first recording: that of the Piano Sonata, which was completed in 2001, two years before the composer's death” (The Guardian)

“Francesco Tristano opens new paths into Classical Music...” (El País)

“The rising young pianist Francesco Tristano played the formidable solo part brilliantly. He had rhythmic bite and color galore, while bringing engaging impetuosity to the music.” (The New York Times)

“The piece 'Hello' marks the musical field in which Tristano operates. The 34 year old pianist from Luxembourg is a figure of hope who aims to inject his audience, a dwindling species of concertgoers interested in classical music, with fresh blood.” (Frankfurter Rundschau, March 2016)

“Francesco Tristano’s “free” improvised Piano Concerto was a brilliantly received example of how classical music is able to excite audiences today. Standing ovations.” (Leipziger Volkszeitung, March 2016)

“[The programme] ... opened and closed with Ravel – Tristano’s own, very skilful, very witty two-piano version of Boléro, which drives to its climax in a wild torrent of clusters and glissandi, and the composer’s own arrangement of La Valse..” **** (The Guardian, June 2015)

“Tristano's impressively assured survey of Berio's piano music ends with an important first recording: that of the Piano Sonata, which was completed in 2001, two years before the composer's death” (The Guardian)

“Francesco Tristano opens new paths into Classical Music...” (El País)

“The rising young pianist Francesco Tristano played the formidable solo part brilliantly. He had rhythmic bite and color galore, while bringing engaging impetuosity to the music.” (The New York Times)