Daniel Blendulf
Conductor

"Daniel Blendulf is simply a conductor of pure quality." (Sydsvenskan, September 2013)

Contacts

Jane Brown +44 (0)20 3725 9129
Anna Finnegan +44 (0)20 3725 9110
Julia Boon +44 (0)20 3725 9115

Biography

The 2014/15 season has seen Daniel Blendulf make a number of highly acclaimed significant international debuts. These include the Sydney and New Zealand Symphony orchestras and the Malaysian Philharmonic Orchestra, as well as the Norwegian Radio Orchestra, Zürcher Kammerorchester and BBC National Orchestra of Wales.

He continues to appear regularly with the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra and the Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra, and returns this season to the Gothenburg Symphony and Swedish Chamber Orchestra.

Recent performances include a concert with the Danish National Symphony Orchestra (as part of Denmark’s Midsummer’s Day celebrations), his Finnish debut with the Tampere Philharmonic Orchestra and concerts

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The 2014/15 season has seen Daniel Blendulf make a number of highly acclaimed significant international debuts. These include the Sydney and New Zealand Symphony orchestras and the Malaysian Philharmonic Orchestra, as well as the Norwegian Radio Orchestra, Zürcher Kammerorchester and BBC National Orchestra of Wales.

He continues to appear regularly with the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra and the Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra, and returns this season to the Gothenburg Symphony and Swedish Chamber Orchestra.

Recent performances include a concert with the Danish National Symphony Orchestra (as part of Denmark’s Midsummer’s Day celebrations), his Finnish debut with the Tampere Philharmonic Orchestra and concerts with the Macao Orchestra and the Orquesta Sinfónica de Tenerife.

As an opera conductor, Blendulf has conducted the Royal Swedish Opera in productions of Carmen (with Katarina Dalayman in the title role), Don Pasquale and the world premiere of Anders Eliasson's chamber opera Karolinas sömn. Other productions have included Gounod's Faust with Folkoperan and Berg's Wozzeck with Norrlandsoperan in Umeå.

In 2014 Blendulf was awarded the Herbert Blomstedt Conducting Prize.

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Contacts

Jane Brown +44 (0)20 3725 9129
Anna Finnegan +44 (0)20 3725 9110
Julia Boon +44 (0)20 3725 9115

Reviews

"Daniel Blendulf draws out a unified and tight orchestral performance in both Tarrodi's minimalist imprinted structures...as well as in Tchaikovsky's more broad romantic landscapes..." (Göteborgs-Posten, May 2015)

“Liadov's The Enchanted Lake…[was] exquisitely finessed by conductor Daniel Blendulf…Prokofiev's Fifth Symphony of 1945 revealed a raw emotionalism that reflected the spirit of the Russian people at that time, with victory finally in view…Blendulf and his musicians caught this in the gruff, reluctant lyricism of the opening Andante and the glinting, spiked dangers that erupt in the second movement. Blendulf unleashed circuses and celebrations in the Finale, to be sure, but

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"Daniel Blendulf draws out a unified and tight orchestral performance in both Tarrodi's minimalist imprinted structures...as well as in Tchaikovsky's more broad romantic landscapes..." (Göteborgs-Posten, May 2015)

“Liadov's The Enchanted Lake…[was] exquisitely finessed by conductor Daniel Blendulf…Prokofiev's Fifth Symphony of 1945 revealed a raw emotionalism that reflected the spirit of the Russian people at that time, with victory finally in view…Blendulf and his musicians caught this in the gruff, reluctant lyricism of the opening Andante and the glinting, spiked dangers that erupt in the second movement. Blendulf unleashed circuses and celebrations in the Finale, to be sure, but not until sombre memories had been voiced by sonorous cellos.” (William Dart, The New Zealand Herald, April 2015)

“What a marvellous, spine-tingling, richly-wrought experience it all turned out to be…Daniel Blendulf…[is] certainly a star performer...he…took the orchestra through a performance of Prokofiev’s Fifth Symphony that seemed to me to express very much what the music is REALLY all about…[During the Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto], Blendulf and the orchestra [were] consistently steering a course between elegance…and excitement…There was piquant elegance a-plenty in the Shakespearean introduction by the orchestra to the slow movement, and a touching sensitivity in all of the various solo decorative figures from the orchestral wind players of the soloist’s melodic lines here –  all of which helped the onset of the finale to make the greatest possible contrast, with its vigorous orchestral declamations and abrupt accents...It’s the kind of music-making I live for, and Janine Jansen, Daniel Blendulf and the NZSO delivered it in spades…[In the finale of Prokofiev’s Symphony No. 5], Blendulf launched the rhythms with tremendous élan, horns punching out the repeated notes, and the clarinet revelling in the open spaces, the tempi obviously putting the players on their mettle…conductor and orchestra took no prisoners, but attacked the notes with tremendous energy and purpose. It was thrilling…A great work, then and a great performance from Daniel Blendulf and the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra.” (Peter Mechen, Seen and Heard International, March 2015)

A similar focus on musical structure was apparent in Blendulf and the orchestra’s majestic account of Sibelius’s Symphony No 5. Sibelius grappled with the symphony for many years before he was satisfied with it. Blendulf illuminated this sense of struggle while achieving the organic development so essential to a successful performance. Key to this was his tempo and dynamic contrasts: deftly deployed accelerandos, ritardandos, crescendos and diminuendos made the musical developments inevitable. Blendulf charted a bold interpretative course, using sharp-edged, grainy sonorities in the slow movement to give the sense of chill winds blowing through an icy landscape. And, in the exhilarating finale, soft woodwind twittering and subtle col legno double bass snaps gently buttressed the famous horn theme. In…Never This Sun, This Watcher…Blendulf effortlessly negoti­ated the work’s rapid changes of tempo, dynamics, mood and texture, and the orchestra responded with precision and insight.” (Murray Black, The Australian, March 2015)

“The Sydney Symphony Orchestra under Daniel Blendulf realised its textures with care, depth and a mood of ruminative reflection.” (Peter McCallum, The Sydney Morning Herald, March 2015)

“…his command of his forces was most impressive, culminating in a scintillating interpretation of Sibelius’ fifth symphony in the second half.” (Steve Moffatt, Manly Daily, March 2015)

“Daniel Blendulf directs three splendidly committed accounts from the Malmö and Swedish Radio Symphony orchestras, and Ellen Nisbeth – for whom A Walk After Dark was written – is a model soloist. Daphne’s sound is excellent and so is this disc.” (Guy Rickards, Gramophone, February 2015)

“…The Allegro Vivace [in Beethoven's Fourth Symphony] was fresh, buoyant, and played with verve … Blendulf listened carefully to the subtleties in the music, and gave the details the necessary attention … Even in the most virtuosic passages one never got the impression of overly polished, cold perfection…but rather a harmonious, even relaxed, confident interaction. The orchestra deserves high praise for this, and I think Daniel Blendulf is a conductor that one must take a note of, and who we hopefully will experience again often in Zurich.” (Rolf Kyburz, Bachtrack, February 2015)

“Dynamic and detailed conducting from Daniel Blendulf” (Lars Henriksson, kultursidan.nu, December 2014)

“A fascinating journey delivered with great vivacity by the passionate young conductor Daniel Blendulf and the remarkably enthusiastic Philharmonic”. (Nicholas Ringskog Ferrada-Noli, Dagens Nyheter, January 2014)

“Conductor Daniel Blendulf delivered beautiful interpretations: Beethoven’s Coriolan overture sounded Mozartian with dark and sweeping undertones and Sibelius's Second Symphony was developed through close attention to detail whilst maintaining focus on the bigger picture. The sound he brought out of the orchestra was warm and overall superb. Daniel Blendulf is simply a conductor of pure quality.” (Sydsvenskan, September 2013)

"Daniel Blendulf, the cellist turned conductor, has gone from young and promising to impressive. In a programme of Beethoven and Prokofiev’s Fifth Symphony, he displayed both musical depth and emotional breadth with assuring confidence. He has the ability to pull out all of the stops while still giving the sound space to breathe - allowing the audience to hear the whole, and the individual lines, simultaneously. (DN.se, May 2013)

“Daniel Blendulf, who has turned to conducting from the cello, steered the orchestra with precision while at the same time bringing to the fore the work's humour and playfulness…He was a confident master of the orchestra and gave every indication that he is someone from whom we can expect great things in the future.” (Värmlands Folkblad, November 2012) 

“Daniel Blendulf brings a graceful and finely balanced approach to the reduced forces of the Kungliga Hovkapellet, and deals masterfully with the challenging acoustics of the hall in bringing both Lena Hoel’s soprano and the delicate instrumental voices to the fore. ” (Nummer.se, June 2012)

Discography

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