Dana Beth Miller
Mezzo-soprano

“And Dana Beth Miller ... brought a powerhouse mezzo bristling with emotion to the title role, Hérodiade” (Washington Post, November 2016)

Contacts

Shirley Thomson +44 (0)20 3725 9173
Georgina Wheatley +44 (0)20 3725 9185

Biography

American-born mezzo-soprano Dana Beth Miller boasts an impressively diverse repertoire including Verdi’s Amneris, Azucena and Ulrica, Wagner’s Erda, Poulenc’s Mère Marie and Bellini’s Adalgisa. In the current season Miller sings Hérodiade with Washington Concert Opera, Ulrica (Un ballo in maschera) with Florida Grand Opera, Amneris (Aïda) with Pensacola Opera, and returns to Grand Théâtre de Genève in Wozzeck after last season’s debut there.

A former member of its ensemble, Miller made her European debut at Deutsche Oper Berlin as Mistress Quickly (Falstaff), followed by her first Erda in two complete Ring Cycles, conducted by Sir Simon Rattle and Donald Runnicles.

American-born mezzo-soprano Dana Beth Miller boasts an impressively diverse repertoire including Verdi’s Amneris, Azucena and Ulrica, Wagner’s Erda, Poulenc’s Mère Marie and Bellini’s Adalgisa. In the current season Miller sings Hérodiade with Washington Concert Opera, Ulrica (Un ballo in maschera) with Florida Grand Opera, Amneris (Aïda) with Pensacola Opera, and returns to Grand Théâtre de Genève in Wozzeck after last season’s debut there.

A former member of its ensemble, Miller made her European debut at Deutsche Oper Berlin as Mistress Quickly (Falstaff), followed by her first Erda in two complete Ring Cycles, conducted by Sir Simon Rattle and Donald Runnicles. In North America, she has sung Saint-Säens’ Dalila (Samson et Dalila) at Tulsa Opera, Adalgisa (Norma) for Florida Grand Opera, Amneris for Arizona Opera, Foreign Princess (Rusalka) for Opera Colorado, and Mère Marie (Dialogues des Carmélites) and Santuzza (Cavalleria Rusticana) with Edmonton Opera. 

In concert, Dana Beth Miller has a repertoire including Verdi’s Messa da Requiem, Mahler’s Symphony No.3 and Das Lied von der Erde, Beethoven’s Symphony No.9 and Stravinsky’s Les Noces.

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Contacts

Shirley Thomson +44 (0)20 3725 9173
Georgina Wheatley +44 (0)20 3725 9185

Reviews

“And Dana Beth Miller, a late replacement, brought a powerhouse mezzo bristling with emotion to the title role, Hérodiade” (Washington Post, Anne Midgette, November 2016)

“mezzo-soprano, Dana Beth Miller stepped into this challenging role with aplomb for a striking company debut. Hérodiade requires both force and expressive beauty, a spiteful villain with a tender heart. Miller had the searing vocal power, a dramatic laser beam of sound she deployed in her first appearance.” (Washington Classical Review, November 2016)

“The real revelation here is Miller as Dalila. This is her first time to sing this role, but her performance had a depth, complexity and richness that made one think she’s been playing this role for years. Miller embodies the many moods of Dalila with an impressive range of tonal colours and adroit phrasing – the plummy sweetness she uses to capture Samson’s attention initially in “Printemps qui commence,” the harsh, bitter tone and whip-crack phrasing as she contemplates wreaking vengeance in “Amour! viens aider ma faiblesse,” the deft shift from coquettish seduction to tearful rage in “Mon cœur s’ouvre à ta voix,” as she toys and manipulates and cajoles Samson to reveal the secret of his strength.” (Tulsa World, May 2016) 

“And Dana Beth Miller, a late replacement, brought a powerhouse mezzo bristling with emotion to the title role, Hérodiade” (Washington Post, Anne Midgette, November 2016)

“mezzo-soprano, Dana Beth Miller stepped into this challenging role with aplomb for a striking company debut. Hérodiade requires both force and expressive beauty, a spiteful villain with a tender heart. Miller had the searing vocal power, a dramatic laser beam of sound she deployed in her first appearance.” (Washington Classical Review, November 2016)

“The real revelation here is Miller as Dalila. This is her first time to sing this role, but her performance had a depth, complexity and richness that made one think she’s been playing this role for years. Miller embodies the many moods of Dalila with an impressive range of tonal colours and adroit phrasing – the plummy sweetness she uses to capture Samson’s attention initially in “Printemps qui commence,” the harsh, bitter tone and whip-crack phrasing as she contemplates wreaking vengeance in “Amour! viens aider ma faiblesse,” the deft shift from coquettish seduction to tearful rage in “Mon cœur s’ouvre à ta voix,” as she toys and manipulates and cajoles Samson to reveal the secret of his strength.” (Tulsa World, May 2016)

“Miller proved a real scene stealer herself, bringing depth of emotion and striking theatricality to Adalgisa’s every appearance. Her rich, smoky sound, ease in the voice’s highest and lowest extremes and firm control were matched by glamour and dramatic intensity. The conclusion of Act I was a high point, Miller’s vocalism fiery and full throated in trio with [Norma and Pollione].” (South Florida Classical Review, January 2016)

“Dana Beth Miller was the perfect Adalgisa; a very feminine woman with a powerful voice that clearly defines this character’s many changes in mood from young girl in a complicated love affair with a man who represents her nation’s enemy, to heartbroken and furious at his betrayal…Miller’s voice has a luscious power that begins in the true mezzo range but unfailingly leaps to the high demands of rage.” (Concertonet.com, January 2016)

“Miller is a knockout in the role of the young priestess-in-training. She nearly steals the show the moment she comes on stage. Her voice is a clarion call with a beautiful evenness from the top of her register to the very lowest tones of her voice. She sings Bellini’s coloratura with clarity, conviction and a true sense of the bel canto phrase. Vocally, Miller possesses one of the largest voices on the stage between the two casts but she manages to balance perfectly regardless of whoever she is singing with…As an actress, Miller was spot-on in her characterization. The naivety and guile of the young woman seduced by the older man and then the heartbroken betrayal when she finds out the truth followed by sincere regret and a desire to make things right. Miller gave the audience every single one of these emotions during her performance.” (Edge Media Network, January 2016)

“Dana Beth Miller as Adalgisa nearly stole the show. She has a powerful mezzo with lustrous colours, and a ringing yet juicy top” (Miami Clásica, January 2016)

“Dana Beth Miller was an elegant, provocative Hippolyta, who looked magnificently beautiful onstage” (Klassik Info, December 2015)

“Dana Beth Miller brought an amber tone to Hippolyta.”(Concertonet.com, November 2015)

“Also making a Knoxville Opera debut was mezzo-soprano Dana Beth Miller in the role of Azucena, the gypsy woman haunted by vengeance, given and received. Miller, who has recently been appearing regularly with German opera companies, was a stunning win for Salesky and KO. Her gorgeously versatile voice was capable of plumbing the depths of darkness and despair as well as caressing the heights of lyrical tenderness, all with expressiveness and power. That ability to contrast darkness with tenderness also contributes to Miller’s sensational dramatic range. Her Act II aria “Stride la vampa” in which she reveals the death of her mother at the stake and the origins of her vengeance, was a masterpiece of narrative singing.” (Knoxville Mercury, April 2015)

“a show-stopping performance by Dana Beth Miller [as Azucena]” (Knoxville News Sentinel, April 2015) 

“The best comic turn of the evening was Dana Beth Miller, who relished her role as the comic servant, Mistress Quickly. Her “Reverenza” speech was delivered with gusto and appropriate coarse gestures, enough to spark the interest of the amorous Falstaff” (Bachtrack, November 2014) 

“Mezzo-soprano Dana Beth Miller, as Sparafucile’s sister Maddalena, the Duke’s unfortunate saviour, has a glowing, penetrative voice” (Daily Camera, March 2014)

“The singing of Dana Beth Miller, as Quickly, was full-throated and richly textured, vocal qualities that were matched by impeccable comic timing and delivery and resulted in a scintillating and often uproarious performance.” (Opera News, November 2013)

“Dana Beth Miller sang her organ-like “Reverenza” and “Povera Donna” so magnificently, that you thought you could see the walls shake or that you were hearing Fedora Barbieri.” (Der Opernfreund, November 2013)

“However, most of the other soloists were excellent, especially Dana Beth Miller, who brought a beautiful contralto and engaged acting to the “sex bomb” Mistress Quickly.” (Das Opernglas, November 2013)

“Dana Beth Miller as Mrs Quickly stands out from the female quartet with wonderful deep notes for “Reverenza” and a homogeneously round voice.” (GB Opera, November 2013)

“Dana Beth Miller unleashed a flashy, comic, and sexual Mrs. Quickly with ominously earthy mezzo depths.” (Deutschland Radio, November 2013)

“Dana Beth Miller relished the upfront chest-voice routine as Mrs. Quickly with aplomb, and ti must be mentioned that the gear change to the middle and upper register was expertly managed, too.”(WordPress.com, November 2013)

“Dana Beth Miller was an utterly charming Mistress Quickly.” (Mundo Clásico, November 2013)

“Dana Beth Miller’s earthy mezzo-soprano transformed Mrs. Quickly, with open hearted bodily expression, into an almost demonic “gossip girl”.” (Der Tagesspiegel, November 2013)

“Dana Beth Miller shone as the scheming Mrs. Quickly” (Berliner Morgenpost, November 2013)

“[As Amneris] Dana Beth Miller makes every mercurial mood change palpable…Miller embodied this character so completely, so believably, that one hardly needed the surtitles to know exactly what Amneris was thinking and feeling. And it was all expressed in a voice of great, yet precisely wielded power, able to cut through the densest ensembles.” (Tulsa World, April 2013)

“Dana Beth Miller masterfully portrays the black soul of Mrs. Sedley”(Operaclick, January 2013)