Case Scaglione
Conductor

“Scaglione cuts an impressive figure on the podium. Follow the name; you won’t be disappointed.” (Alan Adams, Las Vegas Review-Journal)

Contacts

Linda Marks +44 (0)20 3725 9120
Maxim Belčikov +44 (0)20 3725 9143
Alexandra Aimard +44 (0)20 3725 9139

Biography

Chief Conductor Designate: Württembergisches Kammerorchester Heilbronn 

 

American conductor Case Scaglione has impressed orchestras across the globe with his sensitive and thoughtful music-making. The 2017/18 season sees him make concert debuts with the Oulu Symphony Orchestra, Brussels Philharmonic, Ulster Orchestra and the RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra. He also returns to the Orchestre national d'Île-de-France, Kristiansand Symfoniorkester, Sacramento Philharmonic and Rzeszow Philharmonic Orchestra, as well as Brno Philharmonic Orchestra. 

Following his critically acclaimed debut in Germany with the Württembergisches Kammerorchester Heilbronn in June 2016, Case Scaglione was named the Orchestra’s new Chief Conductor in July 2017, with effect from September 2018. In recent years, he has worked among others with Orchestre Philharmonique du Luxembourg, Orchestre de Chambre de Lausanne, Luzerner Sinfonieorchester, Tampere Philharmonic, Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional de Colombia and Bilkent Symphony Orchestra. Among the soloists were artists such as Joshua Bell, Yulianna Avdeeva, Jean-Efflam BavouzetBehzod Abduraimov and Khatia Buniatishvili. 

Chief Conductor Designate: Württembergisches Kammerorchester Heilbronn 

 

American conductor Case Scaglione has impressed orchestras across the globe with his sensitive and thoughtful music-making. The 2017/18 season sees him make concert debuts with the Oulu Symphony Orchestra, Brussels Philharmonic, Ulster Orchestra and the RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra. He also returns to the Orchestre national d'Île-de-France, Kristiansand Symfoniorkester, Sacramento Philharmonic and Rzeszow Philharmonic Orchestra, as well as Brno Philharmonic Orchestra. 

Following his critically acclaimed debut in Germany with the Württembergisches Kammerorchester Heilbronn in June 2016, Case Scaglione was named the Orchestra’s new Chief Conductor in July 2017, with effect from September 2018. In recent years, he has worked among others with Orchestre Philharmonique du Luxembourg, Orchestre de Chambre de Lausanne, Luzerner Sinfonieorchester, Tampere Philharmonic, Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional de Colombia and Bilkent Symphony Orchestra. Among the soloists were artists such as Joshua Bell, Yulianna Avdeeva, Jean-Efflam Bavouzet, Behzod Abduraimov and Khatia Buniatishvili. 

In the US and Canada, Scaglione’s previous engagements have included the New York Philharmonic, Dallas, Phoenix, Detroit and Baltimore symphony orchestras, Calgary Philharmonic and Winnipeg Symphony orchestras. In Asia, he has led concerts with the China Philharmonic Orchestra as well as Shanghai and Guangzhou symphony orchestras, in addition to regular returns to the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra. 

Formerly the Associate Conductor with the New York Philharmonic, Scaglione was previously the Music Director of the Young Musicians Foundation Debut Orchestra of Los Angeles (2008-11), and was the driving force behind the artistic growth and diversification of the organisation, founding their educational outreach initiative ‘360° Music’.

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Contacts

Linda Marks +44 (0)20 3725 9120
Maxim Belčikov +44 (0)20 3725 9143
Alexandra Aimard +44 (0)20 3725 9139

Reviews

[Beethoven’s Coriolanus Overture and Third Piano Concerto and the Brahms First Symphony] “Under the skillful and most musical conducting of Case Scaglione […] these three works revealed a transparency, musicality and beauty that has made them classics. Scaglione’s beat is conservative, clear, and concise; he knows what he wants from the music, and even within the confines of the Van Wezel acoustics, he achieves it.” (YourObserver.com, January 2017)

“His motions were crisp and economical yet expressive and exacting. There wasn’t a wasted motion to be seen. Yet the individual style of the three completely different composers on the program was perfectly realised in his minimal gestures. ... [Scaglione] delivered a virtuoso performance.” (Theater Jones, September 2016)

“With suave cool, Scaglione shaped a richly romantic reading of this glorious warhorse, discovering along the way some lovely wind lines and trombone punctuations this listener had never heard before.” (Casa Magazine, July 2016)

[Beethoven’s Coriolanus Overture and Third Piano Concerto and the Brahms First Symphony] “Under the skillful and most musical conducting of Case Scaglione […] these three works revealed a transparency, musicality and beauty that has made them classics. Scaglione’s beat is conservative, clear, and concise; he knows what he wants from the music, and even within the confines of the Van Wezel acoustics, he achieves it.” (YourObserver.com, January 2017)

“His motions were crisp and economical yet expressive and exacting. There wasn’t a wasted motion to be seen. Yet the individual style of the three completely different composers on the program was perfectly realised in his minimal gestures. ... [Scaglione] delivered a virtuoso performance.” (Theater Jones, September 2016)

“With suave cool, Scaglione shaped a richly romantic reading of this glorious warhorse, discovering along the way some lovely wind lines and trombone punctuations this listener had never heard before.” (Casa Magazine, July 2016)

“Each bar and each beat unveils more beauty. No phrase is rushed and even the Presto in the finale is lovingly shaped and carefully paced.” (Heilbronner Stimme, June 2016)

“With a single perfect gesture, Scaglione was capable of creating a maximum degree of concentration, interest and absorption in the orchestra, as if he were holding a magic wand instead of a baton.” (Mesto Hudby, February 2016)

“The conductor Case Scaglione made a good impression, with his elegant and discreet direction” (Emil Otto Syvertsen, Fædrelandsvennen, April 2015)

“[Case Scaglione] led a richly detailed interpretation of Prokofiev’s Symphony No. 5... [and] vividly conveyed the work’s optimism and energy. The conclusion of the first movement attracted a lone outburst of clapping, quickly stifled… . Mr. Scaglione also revealed the melancholic undertones of the third movement Adagio. The orchestra performed with crisp wit in the lively Scherzo and with vigor and polish in the dynamic concluding movement, after which the audience broke into spontaneous and hearty applause.” (Vivien Schweitzer, New York Times, November 2014)

“[Case Scaglione] led a colorful and sure-paced performance” (Anthony Tommasini, New York Times, February 2015)

“There was much to admire in Scaglione’s command of the Tchaikovsky Romeo and Juliet Overture-Fantasy and Schumann Second Symphony — not least a commendably economical stick technique that still conveyed much important information. The dramatic parts of the former were electrifying, and dynamics and balances in both works were carefully gauged.” (Scott Cantrell, Dallas Morning News, March 2015)

“Scaglione lead the orchestra through a beautifully clean, artistic performance of [Schumann’s 2nd] symphony…. the overall clarity and structure of the piece was emphasized throughout, and there were many moments of gorgeous playing by strings, brass, and woodwinds.” (Catherine Womack, D Magazine, March 2015)

“The fastidious direction by Case Scaglione, associate conductor of the New York Philharmonic, yielded skilled and sympathetic performances. Let’s hope we see more of him.” (Scott Cantrell, Dallas Morning News, January 2015)

“The program was conducted by Case Scaglione, associate conductor of the New York Philharmonic. He did a first-rate job on both pieces….Scaglione got a crystal clear performance out of the DSO players.” (Gregory Sullivan Isaacs, Theater Jones, January 2015)

“Guest conductor Case Scaglione drew crisp, clean playing from the tight ensemble” (Catherine Womack, D Magazine, January 2015)

“The star of the night… . This finale not only brought all those themes emotionally (and literally) together, but offered a performance that was less acerbic than emotional, less demonic than utterly delightful.” (Harry Rolnick, Concerto.net, November 2014)

“Scaglione's conducting style was appropriately exacting, emphasizing an internal momentum that spread subtly yet profoundly through the orchestra… A poignant interpretation depends on a conductor who is acutely attuned to highlighting the expressive details that the composer ascribes to each instrument — from the bend in the flute/oboe melody and the robust vibrato of the cellos and the dark and dystopian brass fanfare. Scaglione was every bit that conductor, sussing out the eccentricities of score and pinpointing the dramatic arc of the music as it darts from one instrumental section to the next.” (Daniel J. Kushner, Democrat & Chronicle, October 2014)

"Scaglione brought power and sweep to this 20th century masterpiece [Prokofiev Symphony No.5]. ...From the stark, somber opening movement, Scaglione drew intrigue and expectation." (Michael Huebner, al.com, May 2014)

“Scaglione had a clear vision of what [Strauss’s Der Rosenkavalier] should sound like; balances, tempos and dynamics all worked together to frame a colorful tonal picture, but it was the sensitive and even glorious interplay within the orchestra that credits the conductor... Scaglione cuts an impressive figure on the podium. Follow the name; you won’t be disappointed.” (Alan Adams, Las Vegas Review-Journal, September 2013)

“Though he was always admirably restrained, never a distraction, Mr. Scaglione lent some drama to the action, turning to various groups and up to the balcony, even sidling up alongside Mr. Gilbert in one particularly thorny section, reminding everyone of just how delicate and nuanced this music is, and how miraculous it is when musicians nail it.” (Andrew Russeth, New York Observer, April 2013)

“Under the leadership of conductor Case Scaglione, assistant conductor of the New York Philharmonic, the [Palm Beach Opera] orchestra provided its usual reliable support to the singers and stepped to the forefront when called upon to deliver passages of dramatic power... From the ethereal violins tones that open [La traviata] to the crackling energy of the gambling scene, the orchestra turned in a first-class performance. Particularly effective was the great ensemble passage after Alfredo humiliates Violetta by throwing money at her, as chorus, soloists and orchestra joined for a passage that came off with almost violent force.” (David Fleshler, South Florida Classical Review, January 2013)

“Scaglione, the 29-year-old assistant to Alan Gilbert at the New York Philharmonic, gave immediate notice of his ability to forge a "sound" with the strings, challenging them with abrupt tempo shifts, gently drawing out lyrical phrases and infusing power when needed. …Scaglione's subtle gestures in the Andante translated to descriptive orchestral color. His exaggerated arm movements in the finale gave the orchestra reason to let loose. It was a satisfying end to a pictorial musical journey." (Michael Huebner, The Birmingham News [Alabama], October 2011)