Andrew Foster-Williams
Bass-baritone

“Andrew Foster-Williams [is] outstanding as the easily manipulated, nervy Gunther.” (Financial Times, Hugo Shirley, July 2016)

Contacts

Shirley Thomson +44 (0)20 3725 9173
Catherine Znak +44 (0)20 3725 9105

Biography

Andrew Foster-Williams is known for incisive characterisations and a diversity of roles that is hard to match. From the early stages of a career built on baroque foundations to the present seasons where the dramatic repertoire dominates his stage appearances, Foster-Willams has received consistent praise for his compelling stage presence and nuanced singing. 

Recent performances have included Pizarro (Fidelio) and Captain Balstrode (Peter Grimes) at Theater an der Wien, Telramund in Wagner’s Lohengrin at the Festival de Lanaudière, Donner (Das Rheingold) at the Ruhrtriennale, Golaud (Pelléas et Mélisande) at Moscow’s famous Bolshoi Theatre and Gunther (Götterdämmerung) in Opera North’s Ring Cycle performed across the UK. 

Andrew Foster-Williams is known for incisive characterisations and a diversity of roles that is hard to match. From the early stages of a career built on baroque foundations to the present seasons where the dramatic repertoire dominates his stage appearances, Foster-Willams has received consistent praise for his compelling stage presence and nuanced singing. 

Recent performances have included Pizarro (Fidelio) and Captain Balstrode (Peter Grimes) at Theater an der Wien, Telramund in Wagner’s Lohengrin at the Festival de Lanaudière, Donner (Das Rheingold) at the Ruhrtriennale, Golaud (Pelléas et Mélisande) at Moscow’s famous Bolshoi Theatre and Gunther (Götterdämmerung) in Opera North’s Ring Cycle performed across the UK. 

This season Andrew Foster-Williams sings Telramund at Théâtre Royal de la Monnaie, Golaud at Ópera de Oviedo and staged performances of The Cunning Little Vixen with The Cleveland Orchestra. Concerts include Messiah with the New York Philharmonic, Vaughan Williams’ A Sea Symphony with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra and Gounod’s Faust with Les Talens Lyriques at Théâtre des Champs-Elysées.

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Contacts

Shirley Thomson +44 (0)20 3725 9173
Catherine Znak +44 (0)20 3725 9105

Reviews

“Andrew Foster-Williams’s biting baritone makes for a splendid Squarocca” (Gramophone Magazine, August 2017)

“the soloists – particularly Andrew Foster-Williams – relish every nuance…offering vibrant, text-alert singing throughout.” (Presto Classical, March 2017)

“Andrew Foster-Williams, the bass-baritone who sang the part of Jesus, went the extra dramatic mile to portray a fully animated character living and feeling in the moment. Foster-Williams was a commanding and resonant figure throughout.” (Cleveland.com, March 2017)

“Andrew Foster-Williams’s biting baritone makes for a splendid Squarocca” (Gramophone Magazine, August 2017)

“the soloists – particularly Andrew Foster-Williams – relish every nuance…offering vibrant, text-alert singing throughout.” (Presto Classical, March 2017)

“Andrew Foster-Williams, the bass-baritone who sang the part of Jesus, went the extra dramatic mile to portray a fully animated character living and feeling in the moment. Foster-Williams was a commanding and resonant figure throughout.” (Cleveland.com, March 2017)

“The performance relied most on bass-baritone Andrew Foster-Williams. Without overacting, he turned the title role into a character: dignified, implacable, ironic, resigned, weary, peaceful, interacting with the chorus. He remained focused on his last emotion when he wasn’t singing and took up a new one when his resonant, flexible voice came into play. His exemplary diction also made clear each utterance of this doom-saying, despairing man.” (Lawrence Toppman, Charlotte Observer, March 2017)

“Bass-baritone Andrew Foster-Williams gave a free and easy, gesture-filled opening solo, which rode effortlessly over the distance from the back of the stage.” (David Bratman, San Francisco Classical Voice, February 2017)

“Andrew Foster-Williams makes an imposing and implacable Père Joseph [in Gounod’s Cinq-Mars]” (Opera Magazine, November 2016)

“Our language [French] holds no secrets for Andrew Foster-Williams ... His death is full of an admirable modesty, a beautiful moment of emotion” [Les Voyages de Don Quichotte, Opéra National de Bordeaux] (Laurent Bury, Forum Opera, September 2016)

“Foster-Williams’s exquisitely chilly and self-controlled Gunther.” (Arts Desk, July 2016)

“Andrew Foster-Williams really came into his own towards the close as a fine Donner.” (Seen & Heard, July 2016)

“Andrew Foster-Williams [was] fabulous as the Gibichung brother…Foster-Williams giving a vivid portrayal of an utter coward.” (Bachtrack, July 2016)

“This Balstrode becomes as interesting a figure as the title role – a challenge superbly met by Andrew Foster-Williams whose passionate and unabashed acting well compliments his effortless expressive singing.” (Moore Parker, Opera Critic, December 2015)

“Andrew Foster-Williams brings a vigorous baritone [as Donner] when he blazes through the fog with a thunderbolt.” (Thomas Whey, Online Musik Magazin, September 2015)

“Andrew Foster-Williams was best of all as Captain Corcoran, vigorous and clear with a beautiful vocal tone and brilliant diction, too.” (Simon Thompson, Seen & Heard, August 2015)

“Andrew Foster-Williams opened the bass-baritone line not like a pompous oratorio singer but like a character in an opera – speaking to the audience, drawing us in, making the words mean something” (Anne Midgette, Washington Post, January 2015)

“Foster-Williams gave the most striking vocal performance of the evening, and was especially effective in “Cade dal ciglio il velo”, undaunted by the elaborate coloratura and the long-phrased melodies” (Simon Rees, Bachtrack, October 2014)

“Andrew Foster-Williams maintains perfect vocal lines and brings all the required darkness to Don Pizzaro” (Michel Le Naour, Concertclassic.com, June 2014)

“As Elijah, Andrew Foster-Williams was a revelation. More than simply the old-testament prophet, he dramatised the hopes and fears of a figure that in lesser hands can come over as a blinkered fanatic. Vocally confident and secure, his rich baritone sailed over all obstacles, helped by the fact that he has the money notes that Mendelssohn always seems to require to ring out on the word “Lord”. His diction was superlative, his use of the text gripping.” (Clive Paget, Limelight, May 2014)

“Andrew Foster-Williams gives a vivid account, ranging over nearly two octaves, of Joseph crushing the head of the “monster called Fanaticism”.” (Richard Lawrence, Gramophone, February 2014)

“Foster-Williams marries an appropriately sympathetic theatrical portrayal with vocal production that is both focused and refined.”(Richard Osborne, Gramophone, June 2015)

“Andrew Foster-Williams does a winning job as Don Giovanni's sidekick Leporello, revealing a particularly astute sense of comic timing while his attention to nuances of text is everywhere apparent and incisive” (Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun, September 2012) 

“For me, Andrew Foster-Williams as Phoenix was a bit of an unsung hero (if that’s not a contradiction in terms) in this production... His charisma, the wry humour of his acting, a total involvement in the role and his outstanding use of the Italian text made his performance a joy to hear and watch. This was excellent, disciplined Handel singing, making the most of Rolli’s libretto as well as bringing in modern filmic resonances to the characterisation.” (Miranda Jackson, Opera Britannia, March 2012)