Alex Otterburn
Baritone

“But the evening belongs to Eddy and to Alex Otterburn’s outstanding performance – an Emerging Artist who has, on this evidence, emerged” (Opera Critic, August 2017)

Contacts

Ian Stones +44 (0)20 3725 9104
Clare Erskine +44 (0)20 3725 9145

Biography

In his first professional season, Alex Otterburn debuts as Eddy at the Edinburgh International Festival in Scottish Opera’s new production of Mark Anthony Turnage’s Greek; and will join the company as a 2017/18 Emerging Artist. His roles include Harlequin (Ariadne auf Naxos) in a new co-production with Opera Holland Park; and he’ll make his debut at the Grange Festival as Pallante in a new production of Agrippina

In his first professional season, Alex Otterburn debuts as Eddy at the Edinburgh International Festival in Scottish Opera’s new production of Mark Anthony Turnage’s Greek; and will join the company as a 2017/18 Emerging Artist. His roles include Harlequin (Ariadne auf Naxos) in a new co-production with Opera Holland Park; and he’ll make his debut at the Grange Festival as Pallante in a new production of Agrippina

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Contacts

Ian Stones +44 (0)20 3725 9104
Clare Erskine +44 (0)20 3725 9145

Reviews

“And there was Otterburn as Eddy: an utterly magnetic monster, spitting out the spoken text one minute, singing with an eerie, yearning sweetness and moving with an almost balletic physical agility the next. Controlled and compelling, he was described in the programme as a ‘Scottish Opera Emerging Artist’. I’d say he’s emerged.” (The Spectator, August 2017)

“Alex Otterburn ’s star turn as Eddy (Berkoff and Turnage’s Oedipus), meanwhile, is a canny study in casual Cockney racism and everyday psychopathy.” (Financial Times, August 2017)

“Alex Otterburn is magnetic as Eddy. The first thing he does is eyeball us in intense silence; this is a performer with serious stage presence and a voice to match. Anyone who saw Marcus Farnsworth in the role will forever have that potency etched into their retinas, but Otterburn makes it his own, cocksure, vulnerable and believable.’ (The Guardian, August 2017) 

“It’s a very strong cast none the less, headed by young baritone Alex Otterburn as an aptly swaggering, needy Eddy” (The Telegraph, August 2017) 

“And there was Otterburn as Eddy: an utterly magnetic monster, spitting out the spoken text one minute, singing with an eerie, yearning sweetness and moving with an almost balletic physical agility the next. Controlled and compelling, he was described in the programme as a ‘Scottish Opera Emerging Artist’. I’d say he’s emerged.” (The Spectator, August 2017)

“Alex Otterburn ’s star turn as Eddy (Berkoff and Turnage’s Oedipus), meanwhile, is a canny study in casual Cockney racism and everyday psychopathy.” (Financial Times, August 2017)

“Alex Otterburn is magnetic as Eddy. The first thing he does is eyeball us in intense silence; this is a performer with serious stage presence and a voice to match. Anyone who saw Marcus Farnsworth in the role will forever have that potency etched into their retinas, but Otterburn makes it his own, cocksure, vulnerable and believable.’ (The Guardian, August 2017) 

“It’s a very strong cast none the less, headed by young baritone Alex Otterburn as an aptly swaggering, needy Eddy” (The Telegraph, August 2017) 

“Alex Otterburn (a recent graduate from the Royal Academy of Music) gave a performance of searing intensity as Eddy, singing with blazing conviction and inhabiting his uncouth and aspiring character with complete ease.” (Classical Source, August 2017) 

“For Scottish Opera Emerging Artist Alex Otterburn in particular, the central role of Eddy is a huge achievement.” (Herald Scotland, August 2017)

“suavity and ring were the hallmark of Alex Otterburn, an on-the-ball Guglielmo whose eyes filled with tears in the final scene.” (Opera Magazine, May 2017)

“The extravagant sashaying of the hip-flask-addicted John Styx (a terrific account by the baritone Alex Otterburn, a 2014 International Opera Awards bursary winner)” (Opera Magazine, April 2017)

“Alex Otterburn impressed as the put-upon John Styx, a classy baritone with a lovely quality to his voice in his Song of the King of Boeotia.” (Bachtrack, February 2017)

“Otterburn proved a master of physical theatre, tripping, lolling and hopak-ing with oafish ineptitude.” (Opera Today, March 2016)

“There’s fine comedy from Alex Otterburn’s drunken Cossack Kalenik.” (The Express, March 2016)

“There is a firm beautiful voice in the making in Alex Otterburn, who negotiated Don Giovanni and the Count in two of the four Mozart excerpts with impressive confidence. An excellent impression - again promises good stuff for the future.” (Brian Dickie Blog, October 2014)

“It's Alex Otterburn in the role of Father who shines; in possession of a powerful voice, he is onstage for too brief a time.” (Broadway Baby, April 2015)